Bureia

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bureia

 

an urban-type settlement in Bureia Raion, Amur Oblast, RSFSR. It is located on the Siberian Highway, 5 km from its intersection with the Bureia River (tributary of the Amur). A railroad branch links Bureia with Raichikhinsk. Population, 8, 800 (1968). There are railroad transportation enterprises in Bureia.


Bureia

 

a mountain range in Khabarovsk Krai, RSFSR. It consists of a row of separated ridges and mountain massifs, composed of granites and gneises as well as sedimentary and effusive rocks. The range stretches almost along the meridian and goes from the sources of the Bureia River south-ward to the upper reaches of the Tyrma River. It is about 400 km long; altitudes range from 1, 000-1, 100 m in the south to 1, 600-2, 071 m in the north. The peaks are flat-topped and bald. Coniferous and broad-leafed forests predominate on its slopes.


Bureia

 

a river in Khabarovsk Krai, Amur Oblast, RSFSR. It flows into the Amur from the left in two branches and is formed by the merging of the Pravaia and Levaia Bureia. The Pravaia Bureia begins on the southern slopes of the Ezop Range and the Levaia Bureia begins on the western slopes of the Dusse Alin’ Range. The Bureia is 623 km long (739 km from the sources of the Pravaia Bureia) and has a basin area of 70, 700 sq km. In its upper reaches the Bureia is a mountain river, flowing at a speed of 3-4 m per sec; further down the valley widens. In its middle reaches it cuts through spurs of the Turana Range and flows through a narrow val-ley. In its lower reaches it emerges onto the Zeisko-Bureia Plain. It is fed chiefly by rainwater. In the summer there are five to seven high-water periods, with the water level some-times rising to as much as 6-10 m. Its principal tributaries are the Niman and Tuiun on the right and the Urgal and Tyrma on the left. The Bureia is suitable for floating logs. It is navigable in its lower and middle reaches and has landing stations at Chekunda, Malinovka, and other places. There are coal and iron ore deposits in the basin.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.