Burgess Shale


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Related to Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion

Burgess Shale

a bed of Cambrian sedimentary rock in the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia containing many unique invertebrate fossils

Burgess Shale

[¦bər·jəs ′shāl]
(geology)
A fossil deposit in the Canadian Rockies, British Columbia, consisting of a diverse fauna that accumulated in a clay and silt sequence during the Cambrian.
References in periodicals archive ?
Highlights from the ROM's extensive Burgess Shale collections will be on permanent display in the future Peter F.
The close resemblances between several Burgess Shale organisms and some Ediacaran ones leads Conway Morris to suggest that at least some members of the early group were indeed animals that survived into the Cambrian period.
A 1909 letter written by Walcott mentions the discovery of the Burgess Shale to University of Toronto professor A.
British paleontologists Derek Briggs of Bristol University and Harry Whittington of the University of Cambridge believe they have found a likely culprit embedded in the Burgess shale.
Stephen, 5 kilometers to the south of Walcott's site, in rocks that are slightly older than the Burgess shale.
Desmond Collins, amassed hundreds of thousands of specimens over 18 field seasons, making the ROM's the largest and most diverse collection of Burgess Shale animals in the world.
It was also believed to have lived during the middle Cambrian period 508 million years ago, hence its age, and was from the renowned Burgess Shale fossil deposit in British Columbia.
BURGESS SHALE ANIMAL Hurdia, from the World Heritage Site in British Columbia, is a strange extinct animal from the 510 million years old Burgess Shale - famous for its unique fossils.
sparsa fossils from the Burgess Shale in Canada revealed that the 10- to 50-millimeter-long critter had a small pair of simple eyes set atop a narrow head.
Pensioner Burgess Shale complained about there being no cheaper tickets for older fans.
Some of the more famous examples are the Burgess Shale in Canada, which preserves soft body outlines of 530,000,000-year-old Cambrian animals; the Jurassic Solenhofen limestones in Germany, where the famous Archaeopteryx is found; and the middle Eocene Messel Oil Shale in Germany, which preserves whole skeletons of many birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and insects.
These fossils originated from the Burgess Shale in western Canada, one of the worlds richest source of fossils from the period.