Burgess Shale


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Related to Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion

Burgess Shale

a bed of Cambrian sedimentary rock in the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia containing many unique invertebrate fossils

Burgess Shale

[¦bər·jəs ′shāl]
(geology)
A fossil deposit in the Canadian Rockies, British Columbia, consisting of a diverse fauna that accumulated in a clay and silt sequence during the Cambrian.
References in periodicals archive ?
A few deposits with exceptionally good preservation of fossils, such as the Burgess Shale in Canada, contribute to the wide range of taxa known from the Cambrian.
The newly discovered rocks are probably about 100,000 years younger than those at the first Burgess Shale site and many of the fossils at the new site are better preserved than their quarry counterparts, the researchers have reported.
Many important evolutionary innovations were limited to 'soft' body parts and organisms, which only became fossilized in rare instances of 'exceptional preservation'--most famously in the Burgess Shale, which was discovered in SE British Columbia in 1909 (see Collins 2009).
KEY WORDS: taphonomy, Lagerstatte, brine seep, exceptional preservation, Burgess shale
The ancient animals of the Burgess Shale are one of the world's most important fossil discoveries.
The exhibit will feature fossils from two different parts of Canada - ancient Ontario fossils and spectacularly preserved fossils from the Burgess Shale in British Columbia.
The crucible of creation is the ancient earth, the world of between 1,000 and 550 million years ago, the period whi ch the geologists call the Precambrian, and then the world just a little later, at the time when the Burgess Shale was laid down, some 525 million years ago.
But the book's subtitle, The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History, tells us that Gould's interest is something else: the nature of history revealed in the Burgess Shale of British Columbia, the most significant of early Cambrian fossil deposits.(2) Discovered in 1909 by Charles Doolittle Walcott of the Smithsonian.
Like several other soft-bodied animals that live around the same time, its fossils were found in the Burgess Shale deposit in Canada, which was discovered in 1886.
The site is home to a new fossil assemblage that is approximately the same age as the famous Burgess Shale deposit in Yoho National Park, only 40 kilometres away.
Washington, March 14 ( ANI ): Scientists at the University of Montreal have been able to identify a strange phallus-shaped creature they found in Canada's Burgess Shale fossil beds, located in Yoho National Park.