burh


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burh

1.The communal fortification of an ancient Anglo-Saxon village.
2. A borough.
References in periodicals archive ?
En el presente estudio no se observo diferencia significativa, ya que se utilizo unicamente una edad de reproductora, sin que se afectara por la temperatura de bulbo humedo (Barbosa et al; 2012, French, 1997, Michels et al; 1974; Fasenko et al; 2001, Wilson, 1991 ; Burh, 1995; Vick et al; 1993; Arce, 1998).
fundavit enim Abbathas de Glaston de Abyndon de Burgo de Torneye et de Ramyseye.' 'Burgo' is probably a variation of 'Burh', an early name for Peterborough.
Aethelflaed's burh building was matched by her brother, who used his fortifications as bases to take back territory.
The status of a Scots borrowing for this word is problematic, insofar as it belongs to the general Germanic vocabulary with cognates in Old English (burh) as well as Old Norse (borg) (OED, s.v.
Turner shows that, during the Anglo-Saxon period, construction and repairs of town walls and defensive fortifications were the obligation of the burh. This system of local obligation collapsed after the Norman invasion and was replaced by murage grants.
Warwick Castle's history stretches back to 914AD when Ethelfleda, daughter of Alfred the Great, ordered the building of a "burh" or an earthen rampart to protect the small hilltop settlement of Warwick from Danish invaders.
By the time the band began playing its last number, aptly titled ' Burh', the audience was tapping its feet to pulsating rhythms.
Of his two manors, Burghill, standing between the river crossing and Hereford and boasting existing earthworks at an Anglo-Saxon burh on a site beside the present village church, would have been an ideal location for his castle.
c....dis gewrit sodlice in dam halgan burh Hierusalem of heofenum dun afeal
"Initially, there was a lot of hope that this would involve people in politics who otherwise wouldn't get involved," said Tami Burh, a researcher with Harvard University's Vanishing Voter Project.
At the centre of it would be a homestead, called a 'burh' or 'burgh', where laws, rules and customs were laid down and administered by the community at their 'moot', or assembly.
The next section consists of five papers that consider various topics of Anglo-Saxon defence: the manuscript sources for West Saxon fortifications (Barbara Yorke); Wallingford in Oxfordshire--a case history (Neil Christie, with Oliver Creighton and Matt Edgeworth); the function of the Anglo-Saxon Burh (Gareth Williams); suburban settlements in late Anglo-Saxon England (Andrew Gate); and the costs and development of civil defence 878-1066 (Richard Abels).