burh


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burh

1.The communal fortification of an ancient Anglo-Saxon village.
2. A borough.
References in periodicals archive ?
And the Burh family have taken a shine to northern cuisine.
The two rulers each developed a mobile standing army and built burhs, fortified settlements, which provided secure bases from which Viking raids were opposed.
Anglo-Saxons, she pointed out, built communal defences such as their many defensive towns, or burhs, fortified against Viking raids, especially in the central kingdom of Mercia.
dis gewrit sodlice in dam halgan burh Hierusalem of heofenum dun afeal
Similarly, BUND 2,21,14,4 (in India, any artificial embankment, a dam, dyke or causeway) and VAND 22,1,14,4 BURH 2,21,18,8 (borough) BUSI 2,21,19 9 (busy) \ (wand) are digital charades.
Initially, there was a lot of hope that this would involve people in politics who otherwise wouldn't get involved," said Tami Burh, a researcher with Harvard University's Vanishing Voter Project.
The next section consists of five papers that consider various topics of Anglo-Saxon defence: the manuscript sources for West Saxon fortifications (Barbara Yorke); Wallingford in Oxfordshire--a case history (Neil Christie, with Oliver Creighton and Matt Edgeworth); the function of the Anglo-Saxon Burh (Gareth Williams); suburban settlements in late Anglo-Saxon England (Andrew Gate); and the costs and development of civil defence 878-1066 (Richard Abels).
Examples of complete obstruent devoicing are plenty in the case of changes like in OE burz > burh 'town' or PGmc hlass > hlaf 'loaf', etc.
Por otro lado, los problemas de definicion mas especificos, ligados a las particularidades de las diversas historias e historiografias nacionales (como Alfoz, Burh, Hundred, Hverfi, Minster .
If the philological and historical reasoning above is sound, we can identify Iudanbyrig as one and the same as Bede's urbs Giudi, the burh looking on muir n-Giudan or the Firth of Forth.
The source of the burh form, the Old English poem, The Battle of Brunanburh, was not intended as a guide to location but as a panegyric of a syllabic construction common to earlier Old English and Germanic verse.
The attempt of the West Saxon kings to secure their domains and promote their territorial ambitions through an articulated system of defense based on the burh, or fortified town, is one firm expression of this tendency.