stone curlew

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stone curlew:

see thick-kneethick-knee,
common name for terrestrial, Old World birds in the family Burhinidae. The name derives from the bird's thickened tarsal joints. Thick-knees are shy, solitary birds. They are rapid runners with long legs and partially webbed feet, which lack a hind toe.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Stone Curlew

 

(Burhinus oedicnemus; in Russian, avdotka), a cranelike bird. It is sandy gray with black markings and a whitish breast; approximately 45 cm long. The curlew lives in Europe, Middle and South Asia, and North Africa; in the USSR it is found in Kaliningrad Oblast, the south European regions, Transcaucasia, Kazakhstan, and Middle Asia.

The stone curlew lives in deserts and steppes near water. The nocturnal bird feeds on insects, lizards, and small rodents. It lays two (rarely, three) yellowish eggs with dark speckles in a depression in the sand or on the ground; both parents sit on the eggs 26 days. It is a migratory bird.

REFERENCE

Ptitsy Sovetskogo Soiuza, vol. 3. Edited by G. P. Dement’ev and N. A. Gladkov. Moscow, 1951. Page 15.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'Mycoplasmas Isolated from Stone Curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus) Used in Falconry in the United Arab Emirates.'Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 40(2): 316-320.
The distribution of the European stone curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus) goes from the central and northern Sahara to the Sind Desert, like that of the cream-colored courser (Cursorius cursor).
The results obtained in this study were compared with values from studies done in houbara bustards (Chlamydotis undulata), kori bustards (Ardeotis kori), stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus), and taxonomically related species from the order Galliformes, family Phasianidae, including ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa), Kashmir native fowl (Kashmir favorella), and domestic fowl (Assil, Fayoumi, and Bangladesh native fowl) (Gallus domesticus).