business

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business

1. an industrial, commercial, or professional operation; purchase and sale of goods and services
2. a commercial or industrial establishment, such as a firm or factory
3. commercial activity; dealings (esp in the phrase do business)
4. volume or quantity of commercial activity
5. commercial policy or procedure
6. Theatre an incidental action, such as lighting a pipe, performed by an actor for dramatic effect
7. a group of ferrets
References in periodicals archive ?
The three chief approaches to valuing businesses are the market approach (what others have paid for comparable businesses), the asset-based approach (essentially the cost to recreate the operating assets of the client's business) and the income approach (how much a buyer could make from the business).
This boot camp is going to be an opportunity because it is a common fact that 80 per cent of businesses fail during their first year, and the Number 1 reason for this failure is the lack of planning and the lack of proper management skills," says Paul Dandavino, a small business consultant with the Timmins and Area Business Self-Help Office.
Although undoubtedly there remain pockets of weakness and problems for individual small businesses, a wide array of statistical indicators suggest that access to bank credit has eased appreciably for all businesses.
Although most (perhaps all) businesses are liquidated at some time or another and do not last forever, a liquidation is not what companies are in business to do, either primarily or secondarily.
CPAs will find that businesses the taxpayer does not engage in for profit won't be allowed any business deduction.
As a result of her involvement with the Small Business Administration's 8(a) Business Development Program, which assists small (and economically) disadvantaged businesses in securing federal contracts, she has secured contracts with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Environmental Protection Agency.
The unexplored issues that inevitably arise when considering these implications, however, are too numerous to be fully addressed here; this item will address a specific (but highly fundamental) issue: the potential for businesses operating through the Internet to inadvertently subject themselves to the taxing jurisdiction of states in which they do not otherwise operate (and were not previously taxable).
The 1993 survey collected data through interviews conducted in 1994 and early 1995 with about 5,300 firms that were selected to provide a representative sample of all small businesses in the United States.
The proposed definition will produce anomalous results depending upon the nature of the businesses in which the taxpayer is engaged and the relative sizes of the separate businesses.
Small Business Administration, 1 million new businesses start up each year.