Busiris


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Busiris

murders predecessor to gain Egyptian throne. [Gk. Myth: Avery, 231]
See: Murder
References in classic literature ?
He wondered to see the lance leaning against the tree, the shield on the ground, and Don Quixote in armour and dejected, with the saddest and most melancholy face that sadness itself could produce; and going up to him he said, "Be not so cast down, good man, for you have not fallen into the hands of any inhuman Busiris, but into Roque Guinart's, which are more merciful than cruel."
Quien no conoce al duro Euristeo y las aras sangrientas del infame Busiris" (131-32).
(30) Jean Giraudoux, La Guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu, Paris, Grasset, 1935, acte II, scene V a la p 121 (<<[m]on cher Busiris, nous savons tous ici que le droit est la plus puissante des ecoles de l'imagination.
Greco-Roman literature, Egypt is also the home of Busiris and human
In support of the claim that Socrates was actually in need of such vindication, Burnet cites a speech of Isocrates against a known critic of Socrates, Busiris. Isocrates laments the many sordid and immoral stories attributed to the gods by the poets and repeated by many, including Orpheus.
Having opened his third campaign with a close second in the Group 3 Prix de Barbeville, Sagaro started hot favourite for the Prix du Cadran but the expected second top-level triumph eluded him, his challenge coming too late to reel in Le Bavard and Busiris. Many doubted the validity of that result and when Sagaro finally made his first trip across the Channel he was confidently backed to turn the tables on Le Bavard.
'His appearance is especially important', Snowden tells us, 'because it shows us one of the ways blacks were employed--namely as bath attendants--attested elsewhere in art and literature.' (13) Similarly, the head of a figure of one of the servants of the mythological Egyptian king, Busiris, is excerpted from a larger scene on a red-figure vase in an argument illustrating that the Greeks could accurately represent, and therefore were familiar with, both 'pure' negroid types and 'black-white crosses' (Fig.