Butorides


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Butorides

 

a genus of birds of the family Ardeidae. There are four species; they are found in the tropics and subtropics. The USSR (the Amur lowlands and the Ussuri River basin) has one species, the little green heron (B. striatus). It is a small heron, weighing 266–370 g. The upper part is black with a green sheen, the underpart is smoky gray, and the throat is whitish. In young birds the back is brownish and the chest has elongated dark brown spots. The birds settle in individual pairs in coastal thickets, building their nests in trees. Each clutch contains three to five eggs. They feed on small fish, less frequently on frogs and invertebrates. The birds are distributed in South America, Africa, Asia, and Australia.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Butorides striatus "garza tamanquita" comun en los pantanos, aunque de Bernacase 1903 indicaba que en aquellos tiempos era abundante.
IDENTIFICATION OF EUSTRONGYLIDES TUBIFEX (NEMATODA: DIOCTOPHYMATIDAE) IN A GREEN-BACKED HERON (BUTORIDES STRIATA, PELECANIFORME: ARDEIDAE) IN THE WETLAND EL BANCO, MICHOACAN, MEXICO
belted kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon) L., green heron (Butorides virescens virescens) L., great blue heron (Ardea herodias herodias) L., American bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus).
The Green Heron (Butorides virescens) is a relatively small, stocky ardeid (241 g; 41-46 cm long) (Niethammer and Kaiser, 1983).
Manjinji Pan had the highest evenness (J' = 0.59) of bird species and the highest number of water fowls and other birds that depend on riparian forests for such resources as food (e.g., Eremopterix leucotis, Butorides striatus and Ardea cinerea).
Although natural expansion of their ranges is possible, given the definitive avian host for the parasite in central Texas is the green heron (Butorides virescens; Kuhlman, 2007), it is more likely that human-mediated expansions of range will occur for these species.
formosanus was recorded firstly in its molluscan intermediary host, the invader thiarid Melanoides tuberculata (MUller, 1774) [31, 32], and recently reported in fish (Australoheros facetus (Jenyns, 1842) and Poecilia reticulata Peters, 1859) and bird (Butorides striata (Linnaeus, 1758)) from the Pampulha reservoir [19, 33, 34].