bylaw

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bylaw

, bye-law
1. a rule made by a local authority for the regulation of its affairs or management of the area it governs
2. a regulation of a company, society, etc.
3. a subsidiary law
References in periodicals archive ?
1) The Consular Notification and Access booklet (79) is a 72-page reference manual that explains and outlines the steps to be taken by law enforcement officers when arresting a foreign national.
James professes a special obligation to the Chancery, which is independent of all other courts and from which there is no appeal but to the king himself: "as I am bound in my Conscience to maintaine euery Courts Iurisdiction, so especially this, and not suffer it to sustaine wrong yet so to maintaine it, as to keepe it within the owne limits, and free from corruption." In this last regard, Chancery must work according to precedents "warranted by Law in the time of the best gouerning Kings, and most learned Chancellours."(99)
Their "purity" is not inherent but "has been sheltered"; their "homes" are not automatically intact but "are protected by law." Jacobs uses a legal model for her appeal and subverts it.
Homes are protected and entry for search is prohibited (except in circumstances determined by law); confidentiality of mail and telegraph communications is protected (except in circumstances determined by law) (Articles 31 and 32).
Led by law professor Catharine MacKinnon and writer Andrea Dworkin, this faction of the feminist movement maintains that sexually oriented expression - not sex-segregated labor markets, sexist concepts of marriage and family, or pent-up rage - is the pre-eminent cause of discrimination and violence against women.
As a result, he expects total law firm activity for 1993 to surpass the 1.4 million square-feet that was leased by law firms in 1992.
The formal education is represented primarily by the educational degrees acquired by law librarians.
Garner and Graham set out the general approach to defining constitutional constraints on the use of force by law enforcement, stating that force used by officers constitutes a seizure under the Fourth Amendment (6) and is objectively evaluated for reasonableness.
It is "illegal" if it is forbidden by law. When the laws making a certain activity illegal are repealed or struck down, we commonly say that the activity has been "legalized." According to The Canadian Law Dictionary, "Although there is a similarity between the words `lawful' and `legal' the principal distinction between the two is that the former contemplates the substance of law, the latter the form of law."