Bykovskii

Bykovskii

 

an urban-type settlement in Bulunskii Raion, Yakut ASSR. It is situated above the Arctic Circle, near the mouth of the Lena River, on Bykovskii Peninsula on the shore of the Laptev Sea. It is linked by shipping routes along the Lena with Yakutsk and by sea with Tiksi and other ports. Population, 800 (1968). It was established in 1942 in connection with the construction of a fish-processing plant.

References in periodicals archive ?
Griffith Mann (Baltimore: Palace Editions, 2005), 15-23; Keenan, "The Long-Awaited Book and the Bykovskii Hypothesis," Kritika 8, 4 (2007): 817-30; Keenan, "Remembering Andre Mazon," Revue des etudes slaves 82, 1 (2011): 115-21.
El Psicoanalisis para Bykovskii es la doctrina del inconsciente, de lo que ocurre mas alla de los limites del yo, teniendo efectos reales sobre las reacciones organicas y convirtiendose, a veces, en su guia.
At that meeting, Zimin first presented his hypothesis: contrary to the long-standing and generally accepted view that the Slovo was produced by an unknown bard in the "Kievan" period, it in fact appeared late in the 18th century and was largely the work of a Ruthenian cleric, Ivan (in religion Ioil') Bykovskii (1726-98).
Quite abruptly at this point in his extended forensic discourse, Zimin turns to Ioil' Bykovskii (304).
Karamzin, and Ivan Bykovskii knew [byl znakom s] the manuscript of the Slovo" (338).
In this section as elsewhere Zimin seems to wish to have things both ways: Bykovskii is a highly educated churchman but also a man of the (unspecified) people; in a collection of songs that may have belonged to Bykovskii, Zimin claims to find "overtones of genuine sympathy for the peasant" (notki iskrennego sochuvstviia k krest'ianam [336]).
speculating upon which texts might also have been found in Iaroslavl', where he places Bykovskii, although there is no proof that Bykovskii was either there or in St.
Then, however, he quite surprisingly jumps to the conclusion that a convolute obtained by Musin-Pushkin from Ioil' Bykovskii (containing a khronograf from the library of the Iaroslavl' Monastery of the Savior) must also have contained the original text of the Slovo.
One cannot, however, fully agree with his method, which relies on some rather speculative historical and metrical analysis--or with his speculation that the relevant portion was added by Musin-Pushkin to the basic text provided by Bykovskii [346-55]);
Zimin stresses the comments of those who heard West Slavic elements in the Slovo; these observations suit his argument, as he portrays Bykovskii as a product of a Polish-Ukrainian educational system (394 etpassirn).
All this suits his hypothesis about Bykovskii, but there can be other explanations of the same phenomena.
For an informative analysis of the departure of leading anarchists (Ol'ga Taratuta, Andrei Andreev, and others) from the All-Union Society of Former Political Prisoners between 1921 and 1935, see Sergei Bykovskii, "Anarkhisty--chleny Vsesoiuznogo obshchestva politkatorzhan i ssyl'noposelentsev," Vsesoiuznoe obshchestvo politkatorzhan i ssyl'noposelentsev: Obrazovanie, razvitie, likvidatsiia, 1921-1935.