Byron

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Byron

George Gordon, 6th Baron. 1788--1824, British Romantic poet, noted also for his passionate and disastrous love affairs. His major works include Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (1812--18), and Don Juan (1819--24). He spent much of his life abroad and died while fighting for Greek independence
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Byronism in America was of a different kind than that in Europe.
"Byronism and Babilanisme in Armance." The Modern Language Review 77 (1982): 797-814.
Amy also seems to be a unique recipient of Jo's anger and jealousy, suggesting a transfer of Jo's moodiness against Amy's sunshine to Laurie, her inner Byronism and cross-gendered romantic views of her sisters.
Soule, Jr, similarly reads the tale as satire, but for Soule 'Metzengerstein' is 'a satiric dramatization of Byronic excess' evinced in the poet's notoriously dissolute life ('Byronism', p.
Two centuries farther along in the history of celebrity, we might be inclined to hear this deflection of fame into nobility as rhetorical sleight-of-hand on Lord Byron's part, another Byronic celebration of his own Byronism. And yet, if so, it does put him, to say the least, in an awkward metaphorical predicament.
(15.) As Layton observes, "Firmly rooted in the sentimental era prior to the conquest of the Caucasus, the zest for actual and armchair traveling was enormously intensified by Byronism in young Pushkin's time [...].
Her forthcoming book, The Dangerous Lover: Gothic Villains, Byronism, and the Nineteenth-Century Seduction Narrative, traces a literary-historical itinerary of the lover whose eroticism comes from his remorseful and rebellious exile, from his tormented and secret interiority.
when in that state he always, surely, jumped--with, as he thought, calculation, but determined to leap, never not to react, given a crisis there was always a romantic, a true, unbogus romantic fatalism, Byronism, a desire to burn boats & above all not plod or drag of be engulphed or close eyes.
A third article, on the sexual psychology of Byronism, is forthcoming in the journal Philosophy and Literature.
IF YOU can stand more portraits of aristocrats from a bygone era, Mad, Bad and Dangerous: The Cult of Lord Byron, at the National Portrait Gallery, examines the writer's life and the influence of Byronism on later literary and historical figures.
Only two full-length studies on Bestuzhev and his work have ever appeared in English, the first more than thirty years ago by Lauren Leighton in the Twayne World Authors Series and the second, more recently, by Lewis Bagby in Alexander Bestuzhev-Marlinsky and Russian Byronism (Pennsylvania State UP 1995).
In one of the book's happiest achievements, Stephen Behrendt challenges the conventional division of Romantic literature into "generations" and demonstrates that once women writers are included, Romantic literary history moves seamlessly ahead with no generation "gap." In Charlotte Dacre, Lady Anne Hamilton, and Lucy Aiken, for instance, Behrendt finds the workings of what would later be called "Byronism." Other contributors take on the Romanticism of consciousness, the sublimity and "greater lyricism" that M.