Byzantine


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Byzantine

1. of, characteristic of, or relating to Byzantium or the Byzantine Empire
2. of, relating to, or characterizing the Orthodox Church or its rites and liturgy
3. of or relating to the highly coloured stylized form of religious art developed in the Byzantine Empire
4. of or relating to the style of architecture developed in the Byzantine Empire, characterized by massive domes with square bases, rounded arches, spires and minarets, and the extensive use of mosaics
5. denoting the Medieval Greek spoken in the Byzantine Empire
www.archaeolink.com/byzantine_civilization.htm
www.metmuseum.org/explore/Byzantium/art.html
http://historymedren.about.com/cs/byzantinestudies

Byzantine

(jargon, architecture)
A term describing any system that has so many labyrinthine internal interconnections that it would be impossible to simplify by separation into loosely coupled or linked components.

The city of Byzantium, later renamed Constantinople and then Istanbul, and the Byzantine Empire were vitiated by a bureaucratic overelaboration bordering on lunacy: quadruple banked agencies, dozens or even scores of superfluous levels and officials with high flown titles unrelated to their actual function, if any.

Access to the Emperor and his council was controlled by powerful and inscrutable eunuchs and by rival sports factions.

[Edward Gibbon, "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire"].
References in periodicals archive ?
Icons are at the center of Byzantine worship, providing windows into the mysteries of the incarnation, heaven and the redemption of man.
Presenting some of their findings from a research project on Byzantine and Jewish medical discourses, researchers investigate the dynamics of cultural transfer and exchange in Byzantine medical traditions from the fourth to the sixth centuries AD and the Jewish tradition primarily recorded in Palestinian and Babylonian Talmuds.
to the First Crusade" by Anthony Kaldellis (Professor of Greek and Latin at The Ohio State University) is the first history of the Byzantine empire in over a century and offers a new reconstruction of the key events and crucial reigns as well as a different model for understanding imperial politics and wars, both civil and foreign.
The third and last chapter of the first section, "Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Music," gives a very simplified overview of Byzantine chant, but unfortunately relies too much on outdated literature (including terminology coined by J.
ER: Let's go back to the emergence of Byzantine studies in the 19th Century.
The name may say blue, but Byzantine Blue is truly a purple in disguise.
It includes subject matter that lies beyond whatever passed for the formal borders of frontier zones in the Byzantine Empire.
5) Subsequently, three countries claimed ownership of the frescoes, but only Cyprus was able to quote the precise origins of the Byzantine frescoes.
The textbooks say the Byzantine Empire was a theocratic autocracy uniting church and state under an all-powerful emperor believed by the Byzantines to be God's viceroy and vicar.
The archeologists know of "the Wine of the Negev" or "Gaza Wine" a named for the port it was sent from to all corners of the empire a from historical sources from the Byzantine period.
Common to studio practice, Byzantine potters trailed slip as a design on the base clay.
The Battle of Malazgirt (Manzikert) was fought between the Byzantine Empire and the Seljuq Turks on August 26, 1071 near Malazgirt town.