Byzantine


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Byzantine

1. of, characteristic of, or relating to Byzantium or the Byzantine Empire
2. of, relating to, or characterizing the Orthodox Church or its rites and liturgy
3. of or relating to the highly coloured stylized form of religious art developed in the Byzantine Empire
4. of or relating to the style of architecture developed in the Byzantine Empire, characterized by massive domes with square bases, rounded arches, spires and minarets, and the extensive use of mosaics
5. denoting the Medieval Greek spoken in the Byzantine Empire
www.archaeolink.com/byzantine_civilization.htm
www.metmuseum.org/explore/Byzantium/art.html
http://historymedren.about.com/cs/byzantinestudies

Byzantine

(jargon, architecture)
A term describing any system that has so many labyrinthine internal interconnections that it would be impossible to simplify by separation into loosely coupled or linked components.

The city of Byzantium, later renamed Constantinople and then Istanbul, and the Byzantine Empire were vitiated by a bureaucratic overelaboration bordering on lunacy: quadruple banked agencies, dozens or even scores of superfluous levels and officials with high flown titles unrelated to their actual function, if any.

Access to the Emperor and his council was controlled by powerful and inscrutable eunuchs and by rival sports factions.

[Edward Gibbon, "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire"].
References in classic literature ?
For hundred of year the Byzantine Empire stood as a barrier against the Saracen hosts of Asia.
During this long period these fables seem to have suffered an eclipse, to have disappeared and to have been forgotten; and it is at the commencement of the fourteenth century, when the Byzantine emperors were the great patrons of learning, and amidst the splendors of an Asiatic court, that we next find honors paid to the name and memory of Aesop.
That's why the 'Girl in the Hat' and the 'Byzantine Empress' have that family air, though neither of them is really a likeness of Dona Rita.
The 'Byzantine Empress' was already there, hung on the end wall - full length, gold frame weighing half a ton.
'Girl in the Hat' and of the 'Byzantine Empress' which excited my dear mother so much; of the mysterious girl that the privileged personalities great in art, in letters, in politics, or simply in the world, could see on the big sofa during the gatherings in Allegre's exclusive Pavilion: the Dona Rita of their respectful addresses, manifest and mysterious, like an object of art from some unknown period; the Dona Rita of the initiated Paris.
They settled Iceland and Greenland and prematurely discovered America; they established themselves as the ruling aristocracy in Russia, and as the imperial body-guard and chief bulwark of the Byzantine empire at Constantinople; and in the eleventh century they conquered southern Italy and Sicily, whence in the first crusade they pressed on with unabated vigor to Asia Minor.
Two men, 25 and 26, were arrested on Friday night in Limassol after Byzantine era coins and ancient artefacts were found in their possession.
Brill's Companions to the Byzantine World; Volume 4
9 (Petra) Jordan has ratified the Charter for the Protection of the Byzantine Heritage Monuments during its participation in the 4th International Conference on "Byzantine Monuments and World Heritage," held in the Greek city of Thessaloniki, from 30 November to 2 December.
The previously unknown piece of holy art was spotted at a Byzantine church in the Negev desert.
Stankovic, Vlada, ed., The Balkans and the Byzantine World before and after the Captures of Constantinople, 1204 and 1453 (Byzantium: A European Empire and Its Legacy), Lanham, MD, Lexington Books, 2016; hardback; pp.
George Byzantine Catholic Church will host an Iconography Workshop April 23-27 at the church, 720 Rural St.