Byzantine architecture


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Byzantine architecture

(300–1450)
When the seat of the Roman Empire moved to Byzantium, a new style became the official architecture of the church.Plans were based on a Greek cross, with a large cupola rising from the center and smaller ones crowning the four small arms. The style was characterized by large domes supported on pendentives, circular or horseshoe arches, elaborate columns and richness in decorative elements. Doorways were square-headed with a semicircular arch over the flat lintel. The round arch, segmented dome, extensive use of marble veneer and rich frescoes with colored glass mosaics are also characteristic of this style. The most well-known examples are the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and St. Marks (illus.), in Venice, Italy.

Byzantine architecture

Byzantine architecture
The architecture of the Byzantine or Eastern Roman Empire which developed from Early Christian and late Roman antecedents in the 4th cent., flourished principally in Greece, but spread widely and lasted throughout the Middle Ages until the fall of Constantinople to the Turks (1453). It is characterized by large pendentive-supported domes, round arches and elaborate columns, richness in decorative elements, and color. The most famous example is the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul (532–537).
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hagia Sophia, which is dominated by a huge dome, is one of the finest surviving examples of Byzantine architecture. Originally a Christian church, it was converted into a mosque in 1453 under the orders of Mehmet the Conqueror when the Ottoman Turks conquered the city.
* The Byzantine architecture, catacombs, artwork, grottos and gardens of the Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America, a short walk from Catholic University's campus, are open for tours or a less formal visit most days of the year.
One of the finest existing examples of Byzantine architecture, the Hagia Sophia bears the evidence of 1500 years of conflict, regime change, and, most noticeably, religious conversion.
For example, Papadatos, an expert on Byzantine architecture and a renowned architect of religious facilities, noted that "fewer people these days sit in pews, but not necessarily by choice." Why?
"Byzantine and Islamic Art History": Gabriele Mietke (late antique and Byzantine architecture), Thomas Leisten (the architectural Hira-style), Alastair Northedge (Samarra), Robert Hillenbrand (Islamic architecture).
We sought longevity and beauty with a dip at the stunning Baths of Aphrodite, marvelled at the rare Byzantine architecture and paintings at the Ayios Neofytos Monastery, and stepped back in time with a visit to the ruins of the ancient house of Greek goddess Dionysos.
The notion of the building as a numinous instrument was continued in descendants of Byzantine architecture as different as Gothic churches of the North and Ottoman mosques in the Middle East.
With its comparatively massive size, cobalt blue color, Byzantine architecture, and three statues on the crown, the structure is hard for passersby to miss.
Guide books tell us the church is the world's finest example of neo-Romanesque Byzantine architecture. I just enjoy the panoramic vistas.
They are, I like to hope, beginning to see that the hidden constitution, with its elaborate rules of etiquette and its byzantine architecture of pretense and its elaborate hierarchies of respectability, is much like the written constitution: It restricts us so we can be free.
Where some of the key building projects were for churches, Byzantine architecture might have been considered a useful bridge to the east.