Byzantium

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Byzantium

(bīzăn`shēəm, –shəm, –tēəm), ancient city of Thrace, on the site of the present-day İstanbul, Turkey. Founded by Greeks from Megara in 667 B.C., it early rose to importance because of its position on the Bosporus. In the Peloponnesian War it was captured and recaptured by the contending forces. It was taken (A.D. 196) by Roman Emperor Septimius Severus. Constantine I ordered (A.D. 330) a new city built there; this was ConstantinopleConstantinople
, former capital of the Byzantine Empire and of the Ottoman Empire, since 1930 officially called İstanbul (for location and description, see İstanbul). It was founded (A.D. 330) at ancient Byzantium (settled in the 7th cent. B.C.
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, later the capital of the Byzantine Empire.
References in periodicals archive ?
2014) "Dios, Logos y Fuego en Heraclito", en Byzantion Nea Hellas, 33, 2014.
75) Stephen Gero, 'Notes on Byzantine Iconoclasm in the Eighth Century', Byzantion 44, 1-2 (1974): 23-42, 34-5.
1996) Istanbul an urban history: Byzantion, Constantinopolis, Istanbul, The Economic and Social History Foundation of Turkey, Istanbul.
Cartledge has chosen eleven cities grouped in periods: Cnossos and Mycenae (prehistory); Argos, Miletus, Massalia and Sparta (early history to 500 BC); Athens, Syracuse and Thebes (500-330 BC); Alexandria (Hellenistic) and Byzantion.
On imperial bride-shows in Byzantine history and literature, see Warren Treadgold, "The Bride-shows of the Byzantine Emperors," Byzantion 49 (1979): 395-413, who also mentions Esther 2 as the inspiration behind Byzantine bride shows (398); Lennart Ryden, "The Bride-shows at the Byzantine Court--History or Fiction?
lt;<Themistius' concept of Philanthropia>>, Byzantion 45 (1975) 22-40.
Also see Eric Voegelin, "The Mongol Orders of Submission to European Powers, 1245-1255," Byzantion 15, 1940-41, 378-413; Jean Richard, "Ultimatums Mongols et letters aprocryphes: l'Occident et les motifs de guerre des Tartares," Central Asiatic Journal 17, 1973, 212-22; Ruotsala, Europeans, 100, 107-9.
How little, ancient Byzantion became Constantine's capital, how next that capital engendered the great Byzantine Christian culture up to the conquest of Mehmed II, who then turned it into a cosmopolitan centre where Orthodox Greeks of Phanarion coexisted alongside their new Ottoman rulers and the Armenians--all of this is the subject of an exhibition that is first and foremost a narrative of complex and entrenched history.
7) Voir nos articles <<Julien l'Apostat contre les Parthes : un guerrier impie>>, Byzantion 61, 1991, 458-495; <<Le poete Claudien connaissait-il le mytheme du guerrier impie>>, OHodagos 2, 1991, 284-292; <<L.
lt;<La relation russe de la quatrieme croisade>>, en: Byzantion, LVIII, 1988, 1.