Byzantium

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Byzantium

(bīzăn`shēəm, –shəm, –tēəm), ancient city of Thrace, on the site of the present-day İstanbul, Turkey. Founded by Greeks from Megara in 667 B.C., it early rose to importance because of its position on the Bosporus. In the Peloponnesian War it was captured and recaptured by the contending forces. It was taken (A.D. 196) by Roman Emperor Septimius Severus. Constantine I ordered (A.D. 330) a new city built there; this was ConstantinopleConstantinople
, former capital of the Byzantine Empire and of the Ottoman Empire, since 1930 officially called İstanbul (for location and description, see İstanbul). It was founded (A.D. 330) at ancient Byzantium (settled in the 7th cent. B.C.
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, later the capital of the Byzantine Empire.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Barnard, 'The Emperor Cult and the Origins of the Iconoclastic Controversy', Byzantion 43 (1973): 13-29; see also Helmut Koester, History, Culture And Religion of the Hellenistic Age, vol.1, Fortress Press (Philadelphia: de Gruyter, 1982), 32-36.
Eine griechische Wortpragung auf ihrem Wege von Aischylos bis Theodoros Metochites>>, Anzeiger 100 (1963) 1-20; DALY, L.J., <<Themistius' concept of Philanthropia>>, Byzantion 45 (1975) 22-40; para Juliano el Apostata, cfr.
Vasiliev, "Pero Tafur, a Spanish Traveler of the Fifteenth Century and His Visit to Constantinople, Trebizond and Italy," Byzantion 7 (1932) 106 ff.
Wolf, however, by using a variant of Byzantion, the name of the Greek city subsumed by Constantinople, acknowledged and paid tribute to the Greek heritage of the empire.
Markou Renieri Istorikai Meletai, 0 Hellen Papas Alexandros o 50s, to Byzantion kai he en Basileia Synodos.
Nelson, "La famille de Charlemagne," Byzantion 61 (1991): 194-212; for the problems in the families of Charles the Bald and Louis the German and an explicit connection to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, see Janet L.
This lecture eventually became the article "Humanism and Scholasticism in Renaissance Italy" (hereafter, "Humanism and Scholasticism"), published in Byzantion. This volume of Byzantion is dated 1944-1945, but is really 1946; see the copyright on p.
Postan (Berkeley: U of California P, 1977), 15-58; Rene Louis, "Les Ducs de Normandie dans les chansons de geste," Byzantion 28 (1948): 391-419.
Falkenstein, `Charlemagne et Aix-la-Chapelle', Byzantion, lxi (1991); for Lothar's grant to Aachen, see Lotharii II Diplomata, ed.