C-Linda

C-Linda

(language)
The most widely used variant of Linda, with C as the base language. It is available from Sci Comp Assocs <linda@sca.com>.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Given this observation, we can outfit all three groups in essentially the same way: we supply them with C-Linda, Schema-Linda and Prolog-Linda.
Scientific Computing Associates now supports Fortran-Linda as well as C-Linda. The "Piranha" system, which executes Linda programs on conventional local networks in such a way that idle workstations may join an ongoing computation, and participating workstations may withdraw quickly when their owners need them, runs on 60 workstations in the Yale Computer Science Department and has been used to execute a variety of production applications.
The authors' claim that C-Linda results in code which is more readable than Parlog86 or Crystal is true, but that it is different from message-based systems is not true.
In principle, such tools could be built for C-Linda, Fortran-Linda, etc., but I expect they would be too complex to do in practice.
C-Linda, for example, relies on some sophisticated compiler optimizations based upon a global analysis of the restricted ways in which classes of tuples are used.
For one thing, "C-Linda," as Kahn and Miller point out in their note, "relies upon some sophisticated compiler optimizations based upon a global analysis of the restricted ways in which classes of tuples are used.
Shapiro has attempted to embed the coordination aspects of C-Linda within (the complete language) FCP; a comparable experiment would attempt to embed the coordination aspects of FCP within C-Linda.
They are comparable in length (in both cases initialization code is omitted, amounting to several lines in C-Linda and probably about the same for Parlog86).
A Parlog86 proponent would almost certainly call Parlog86 a "higher-level" language than C-Linda; but we've shown that it is somewhat easier to solve the client-server problem in C-Linda than in Parlog86, and much easier to solve the dining philosophers problem.
One version is written using a pure functional language (the language shown is Crystal); the other version uses C-Linda. Although the two programs do not differ by much, the C-Linda version is slightly longer.
The C-Linda version isn't a set of equations; it is a fine grained explicitly parallel program.
The C-Linda version is longer, but the difference in compactness seems minor.