Carlo Emilio Gadda

(redirected from C. E. Gadda)

Gadda, Carlo Emilio

 

Born Nov. 14, 1893, in Milan. Italian writer.

Gadda began his literary career at the end of the 1920’s. His talent unfolded after Italy’s liberation from fascism: the antifascist collection Stories From the Duchy Aflame (1953) and the satirical-grotesque novel Acquainted With Grief (final version, 1963). His most characteristic work is the novel That Awful Mess on Via Merulana (1948; final version, 1957), which depicts life in Rome under fascism. Uniquely interwoven in Gadda’s works are elements of verism and satire as well as a refined psychologism. The writer exposes the mores of bourgeois Italy. Elements of various dialects and slang are merged in Gadda’s complex language.

WORKS

La madonna dei filosofi. Florence, 1931.
Il castello di Udine. Florence, 1934.
Eros e Priapo. Milan, 1967.
La Meccanica. Milan, 1970.

REFERENCES

Fiorentino, L. Narratori del Novecento. Milan, 1960.
Seroni, A. “C. E. Gadda.” Paragone, 1969, no. 230.

G. D. BOGEMSKII

References in periodicals archive ?
Terzoli to the poem in its 1932 and 1963 version in C. E. Gadda, Poesie, pp.
56-57; now in C. E. Gadda, Scritti dispersi, in Saggi Giornali Favole e altri scritti, vol.
Terzoli, "Introduzione" to C. E. Gadda, Poesie, pp.
Saggi, note e divagazioni, Milan: Adelphi, 1982; now in C. E. Gadda, Scritti dispersi, in Saggi Giornali Favole e altri scritti, vol.
75-101; now in C. E. Gadda, Saggi Giornali Favole e altri scritti, vol.
57-71; then in C. E. Gadda, Gli anni, now in Saggi Giornali Favole e altri scritti, vol.
365-379, now in C. E. Gadda, Scritti dispersi, in Saggi Giornali Favole e altri scritti, vol.
189-204; now in C. E. Gadda, Scritti dispersi, in Saggi Giornali Favole e altri scritti, vol.
33-34, then in C. E. Gadda, Il tempo e le opere; now both articles are in C.
136-141, now in C. E. Gadda, Scritti dispersi, in Saggi Giornali Favole e altri scritti, vol.
Yet, it is perhaps in his groundbreaking studies on C. E. Gadda that Robert Dombroski's accomplishments in the field of modern Italian literature are most apparent.
However, unlike the scapigliato Dossi and C. E. Gadda, Caconcelles is a writer tending toward the horizon of absolute words.