chisel

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chisel

a. a hand tool for working wood, consisting of a flat steel blade with a cutting edge attached to a handle of wood, plastic, etc. It is either struck with a mallet or used by hand
b. a similar tool without a handle for working stone or metal
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chisel

 

(in Russian, doloto, also drill bit), a manual or machine woodworking tool for hollowing out openings, recesses, grooves, and so on. Hollow chisels with a drill inside are used in drilling and mortising machines. Chisels are also used for carving bone and other materials. Flint chisels began to be used in the Upper Paleolithic and bronze chisels, in Egypt and Mesopotamia during the third millennium B.C.; iron chisels were used in the ninth and eighth centuries B.C. In Russia steel chisels with cutting edges of standard dimensions were already being used during the tenth to 13th centuries A.D.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

chisel

[′chiz·əl]
(agriculture)
A strong, heavy tool with curved points used for tilling; drawn by a tractor, it stirs the soil at an appreciable depth without turning it.
(design engineering)
A tool for working the surface of various materials, consisting of a metal bar with a sharp edge at one end and often driven by a mallet.

Chisel

[′chiz·əl]
(astronomy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chisel

chisel
A hand tool with a cutting edge on one end of a metal blade (usually steel); used in dressing, shaping, or working wood, stone, metal, etc.; usually driven with a hammer or mallet. Also see cold chisel and wood chisel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

CHISEL

(language)
An extension of C for VLSI design, implemented as a C preprocessor. It produces CIF as output.

["CHISEL - An Extension to the Programming language C for VLSI Layout", K. Karplus, PHD Thesis, Stanford U, 1982].
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
C. trachomatis was detected in 91 (9.6% [95% CI 7.8%-1L7%]) of 948 men tested at both sites, and N.
The trachomatous inflammation-follicular could alternatively be due to organisms other than C. trachomatis .[24],[43] Copan swabs were recommended for sample collection.[44] Several testing methods, such as culture, serology, immunofluorescence test, complement fixation test and PCR were applied in detection.
In chronically infected patients negative for endocervical C. trachomatis, a positive serological test may be the only indication of chlamydial involvement.
Infected cells were grown for 42 h on coverslips in 24-well plates, fixed with methanol and visualized with C. trachomatis species-specific or genus-specific monoclonal antibodies.
After washing and 1-hour incubation with monoclonal antibody against C. trachomatis MOMP (NearMedic Plus, RF), the cells were washed again with PBST and exposed to anti-mouse IgG conjugated with horseradish peroxidase.
Se realizaron estudios citopatologicos cervicales en trabajadoras sexuales en Nigeria, encontrando baja asociacion entre infeccion por Chlamydia trachomatis y cervicitis, incluso en esta poblacion de riesgo (8); Otro estudio transversal con 324 mujeres encontro que la prevalencia de infeccion con C. trachomatis y N.
The suggested mechanisms by which C. trachomatis can trigger PTB or abortion are invasion of chlamydia into the choriodecidual space and subsequent immune responses (6) and placental inflammation, especially chorioamnionitis (9).
(6) Cervical cytological abnormalities are associated with C. trachomatis, HSV 2 infections, Tricomoniasis and Candidiasis.