chisel

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chisel

a. a hand tool for working wood, consisting of a flat steel blade with a cutting edge attached to a handle of wood, plastic, etc. It is either struck with a mallet or used by hand
b. a similar tool without a handle for working stone or metal

Chisel

 

(in Russian, doloto, also drill bit), a manual or machine woodworking tool for hollowing out openings, recesses, grooves, and so on. Hollow chisels with a drill inside are used in drilling and mortising machines. Chisels are also used for carving bone and other materials. Flint chisels began to be used in the Upper Paleolithic and bronze chisels, in Egypt and Mesopotamia during the third millennium B.C.; iron chisels were used in the ninth and eighth centuries B.C. In Russia steel chisels with cutting edges of standard dimensions were already being used during the tenth to 13th centuries A.D.

chisel

[′chiz·əl]
(agriculture)
A strong, heavy tool with curved points used for tilling; drawn by a tractor, it stirs the soil at an appreciable depth without turning it.
(design engineering)
A tool for working the surface of various materials, consisting of a metal bar with a sharp edge at one end and often driven by a mallet.

Chisel

[′chiz·əl]
(astronomy)

chisel

chisel
A hand tool with a cutting edge on one end of a metal blade (usually steel); used in dressing, shaping, or working wood, stone, metal, etc.; usually driven with a hammer or mallet. Also see cold chisel and wood chisel.

CHISEL

(language)
An extension of C for VLSI design, implemented as a C preprocessor. It produces CIF as output.

["CHISEL - An Extension to the Programming language C for VLSI Layout", K. Karplus, PHD Thesis, Stanford U, 1982].
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