CCR5

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CCR5

(medicine)
Belonging to the seven-transmembrane chemokine receptor family, the major cofactor for primary macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 strains.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The CCR5 receptor appears to play a central role in modulating immune cell trafficking to sites of inflammation and may be important in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and other inflammatory conditions.
- August 22, 2019) - The Stock Day Podcast welcomed CytoDyn (OTCQB: CYDY) ("the Company"), a biotechnology company developing innovative treatments for multiple therapeutic indications based on leronlimab, a novel humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the CCR5 receptor. President and CEO, Dr.
Replacing immune cells with those that don't have the CCR5 receptor appears to be key in preventing HIV from rebounding after the treatment.
But a very small number of people who are resistant to HIV have two mutated copies of the CCR5 receptor. This means the virus cannot penetrate cells in the body that it normally infects.
LPS induces CCR5 receptor expression via the EGFR, COX-2 and ERK1/2 pathways
The CCR5 receptor is a major entry site for macrophage-tropic (CCR5 tropic) HIV-1 strains into host cells.
Altering CCR5 receptor will help disable the virus' ability to use T-cells to infect humans.
One of the chemokines that uses the CCR5 receptor to recruit macrophages to the inflammatory site is CCL3.
Based on these observations, the antiretroviral drug Maraviroc has been used as it is a CCR5 receptor antagonist, thereby blocking the HIV protein from associating with the receptor.
"One thing that we've lacked is a high-resolution molecular ' picture' of the CCR5 receptor structure that we can use for precise drug design," Beili Wu, professor at the Chinese Academy of Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, part of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said in a statement.
Today the mutation can be found in [approximately equal to]10% of all those of northern European descent, preventing expression of the as-yet mostly inscrutable CCR5 receptor on the surface of many different subsets of immune cells.