CD-ROM

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Related to CD-ROM player: CD-ROM drive

CD-ROM:

see compact disccompact disc
(CD), a small plastic disc used for the storage of digital data. As originally developed for audio systems, the sound signal is sampled at a rate of 44,100 times a second, then each sample is measured and digitally encoded on the 4 3-4 in (12 cm) disc as a series of
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.

CD-ROM

[¦sē¦dē ′räm]
(computer science)

CD-ROM

compact disc read-only memory; a compact disc used with a computer system as a read-only optical disk

CD-ROM

CD-ROM

(Compact Disc-Read Only Memory) A type of CD disc that can only be read, but not recorded. Used to store programs and data files, a CD-ROM holds 650MB or 700MB of data and employs a different recording format than the audio CD (CD-DA), from which it evolved. In the 1990s, the CD-ROM rapidly replaced the floppy disk for software distribution.

An audio CD player cannot read CD-ROMs, but CD-ROM drives can play audio discs. In practice, the term "CD" refers to all CD formats. The phrase "insert the installation CD" really means "insert the installation CD-ROM."

How CD-ROMs Are Made
CD-ROMs are made by "burning" a blank CD-R disc and sending it to a media manufacturer, which creates a master disc that is used to stamp out the required quantity. See CD-R and mini CD.

Pretty Slow in the Beginning
Back in the late 1980s, the first CD-ROM drives transferred data at 150KB per second. By doubling the spindle speed from 530 to 1,060 RPM, the transfer rate doubled to 300KB (2x). For several years thereafter, speeds increased until reaching 48x and higher, making the "1x" drive painfully slow by comparison. For details about speeds, see CD-ROM drives. Access times range from 80 to 150ms. See CD-R, CD-RW, DVD and optical disc.


Caddy Load and Tray Load
Earlier drives used a caddy. The disc must be inserted into the caddy, and the caddy inserted into the drive. Today, drives are caddyless. The disc is placed into a tray.




Caddy Load and Tray Load
Earlier drives used a caddy. The disc must be inserted into the caddy, and the caddy inserted into the drive. Today, drives are caddyless. The disc is placed into a tray.







Reading CDs and CD-ROMs
Digital data are carved into the disc as pits (low spots) and lands (high spots). As the laser shines into the moving pits and lands, a sensor detects a change in reflection when it encounters a transition from pit to land or land to pit. Each transition is a 1. The lack of transitions are 0s. There is only one laser in a drive. Two are used here to illustrate the difference in reflection.







References in periodicals archive ?
I also prefer an external CD-ROM player to one that's built into your computer.
Kodak, for instance, is promoting a photo CD; this device is much simpler than a CD-ROM player and could replace the slide projector as the standard for presentations.
* 1 CD-ROM player compatible with Microsoft Extensions
Actually, even the standard version has the ability to create audio files from an audio CD as long as it is used on a CD-ROM player that can not only play audio CDs but also extract audio tracks.
A menu was created that included an option to run CD-ROM programs if a CD-ROM player was connected to that machine.
* For advanced aficionados, a read/write CD-ROM player that enables images to be transferred from the hard drive to the CD-ROM player.
The Toast 3.8 software features hybrid CD support, enabling users to create CDs that can be read on a Mac or PC with a CD-ROM player or an audio CD player, and it also supports all the latest CD-R/RW drives on the market.
The following equipment is needed to use the Inside CD-ROM service: a 386 IBM or compatible PC with 512 KB of available RAM, approximately 5 MB of hard disk space, a CD-ROM player and controller card with Microsoft Extensions-compatible device driver, DOS version 3.1 or greater, a Hayes-compatible modem, access to a telecommunications network, and access to a printer and fax machine (optional).
HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: For Macintosh: 8MB RAM, system 7.0 or later, CD-ROM player, color monitor.
Sony's new portable Multimedia CD-ROM Player (MMCD) integrates a CD-ROM XA drive, a DOS-compatible microprocessor, a 256-color LCD display panel, a speaker, a keyboard and a cursor pad in a two-pound package.
For example, a CD-ROM XA disc can be used with both a CD-I player and a CD-ROM player, a Photo CD can be utilized in a CD-ROM XA drive, and a DVI card can capture to or play from any CD-ROM unit.
Available for under $1,000, you can get a starter kit, which comes with a CD-ROM player and software.