CMYK

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CMYK

(graphic arts)
A color model that synthesizes all colors as combinations of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black; it begins with white, and subtracts the appropriate color to yield the desired color. Also known as CMY.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

CMYK

(graphics)
cyan, magenta, yellow, key.

A colour model that describes each colour in terms of the quantity of each secondary colour (cyan, magenta, yellow), and "key" (black) it contains. The CMYK system is used for printing. For mixing of pigments, it is better to use the secondary colours, since they mix subtractively instead of additively. The secondary colours of light are cyan, magenta and yellow, which correspond to the primary colours of pigment (blue, red and yellow). In addition, although black could be obtained by mixing these three in equal proportions, in four-colour printing it always has its own ink. This gives the CMYK model. The K stands for "Key' or 'blacK,' so as not to cause confusion with the B in RGB.

Alternative colour models are RGB and HSB.
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CMYK

(Cyan Magenta Yellow blacK) The color space used for commercial printing and most color computer printers. In theory, cyan, magenta and yellow (CMY) can print all colors, but inks are not pure and black comes out muddy. The black ink (K) is required for quality printing. See color space, RGB and ink coverage.


Colors Are Separated
Before printing, the image is separated into CMYK inks that blend together when printed. (Image courtesy of Intergraph Computer Systems.)







A CMYK Printer
Color laser printers use four toner cartridges. Unlike commercial printing, in which the page is printed four times, each of the four inks in a laser printer is applied to the drum, and then the page is printed.







CMYK Ribbon
This is a dye sublimation or thermal wax transfer ribbon where four panels of dye or wax-based ink exist for each page, and each panel is the size of the page. After printing a page, the ribbon is advanced to the next four-color set. See dye sublimation printer and thermal wax transfer printer.







CMYK and More
For greater color accuracy, some inkjet printers use more than CMYK. The Canon printer (top) adds a gray (GY) cartridge. The Epson (bottom) includes lighter versions of cyan and magenta. See PGBK.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The WBCs identification was made possible by the transfiguration in the CMYK color model. In fact, we have observed that leukocytes are further distinguished in the Y component of CMYK color model, this is because the yellow color is existing in all the elements were recognized by Lorenzo Putzu.
A total of 12 colors (three primary, three secondary, and six tertiary) were identified according to the CMYK color model (Pantone, LLC, 1992).
The CMYK color model, often referred to as process color or four color, is a subtractive color model, used in color printing, also used to describe the printing process itself.
Four different intermediary threshold-based conversions are used in order to obtain the final black and white document: threshold applied to the grayscale transformation of the image; threshold applied to the K component of the CMYK color model; thresholding each component of the RGB color model with the minimum average intensity of channels and a variable thresholding technique based on the hue component.