depressant

(redirected from CNS depressant)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

depressant

depressant, any one of various substances that diminish functional activity, usually by depressing the nervous system. Barbiturates, sedatives, alcohol, and meprobamate are all depressants. Depressants have various modes of action and effects. Some are primarily used medically to relieve emotion stress, anxiety, and tension; others induce sleep, and still others are used to relieve pain. Depressants also reduce the rate and force of contraction of the heart and are used in the treatment of some forms of heart disease. Many depressants can induce psychological dependence and addiction (see drug addiction and drug abuse). Typically, overdosage results in confusion, coma, and convulsions. In many cases, the effects of one depressant are intensified if another depressant is taken at the same time, e.g., if barbiturates are taken with alcohol. Because of their potential for abuse, there are now strict regulations regarding the dispensing of many depressant drugs.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

depressant

1. Med able to diminish or reduce nervous or functional activity
2. a depressant drug
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, our research group has studied EOs and their isolated compounds, focusing on the development of CNS depressants with fewer side effects (7,8,11).
However, concomitant use of alprazolam, with other CNS depressants such as alcohol and opioid analgesics, could have an additive CNS depression effect and lead to severe toxicity or even death.
The first group is made up of drugs which reduce brain activity, termed CNS depressants; the second group of drugs is made up of those which act increasing brain activity, termed CNS stimulators; and a third group is made up of those drugs which act by qualitatively modifying brain activity, being termed hallucinogens.
Always home.' Furthermore, as long-term use of CNS depressants has a tendency to suppress REM-sleep, dreams tend to creep into the waking state.
It is possible that other CNS depressants or psychotropic medications may exert similar effects on nighttime arousals as Zolpidem did in this study.
Drugs that cause central nervous system depression (CNS depressants), including controlled substances are among drugs that would be cause for concern if found in specimens from a nurse while on duty or subject to call, regardless of if the nurse exhibited impaired behavior.
It can interact with CNS depressants and stimulants, and tolerance often develops.
Part III is divided into 13 chapters covering Alcohol, CNS Depressants, Opioids, Cocaine, Marijuana, Amphetamines/Sympathomimetic Amines, Hallucinogens, Anticonvulsant and Antiarrhythmic Drugs, Antidepressant Drugs, Neuroleptic Drugs, Carbon Monoxide/ Cyanide, Inhalants, and Metals.
Mixed with opioid painkillers such us OxyContin and Vicodin, or CNS depressants such as Valium and Xanax, alcohol can slow breathing, causing respiratory failure and death.