crest

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crest,

in feudal livery, an ornament of the headpiece that afforded protection against a blow. The term is incorrectly used to mean family coat of arms. Crests were widely used in the 13th cent. by feudal chiefs, as they had been by ancient Greek warriors and the Roman centurions. The earlier forms were usually of stuffed leather, gilded, silvered, or painted; later they were of wood or metal. The crest came to be used in heraldryheraldry,
system in which inherited symbols, or devices, called charges are displayed on a shield, or escutcheon, for the purpose of identifying individuals or families.
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, first only by persons of high rank, then by all those entitled to a coat of arms. It surmounts the escutcheon; its colors are those of the coat of arms. The dragon, wivern, and plume of feathers are common crests. The lion, used by Edward III of England, remains the crest of the English sovereigns. See also blazonryblazonry
, science of describing or depicting armorial bearings. The introduction, since the Middle Ages, of artificial rules and fanciful medieval terms has complicated the science, particularly in England.
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.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Crest

Ornament on a roof, a roof screen or wall, which is frequently perforated, and consists of rhythmic and identical decorative patterns.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Crest

 

(1) A bony protrusion in vertebrates and man that increases the area for muscle attachment. For example, the skulls of many mammals have, on the occipital and parietal bones, crests whose size depends upon the degree of development of the attached musculature. The sternum of flying birds has a high thin crest called the carina, to which the pectoral muscles, which draw the wings downward, are attached.

(2) A fleshy growth (in English, also called the comb) at the top of the head in some birds (many gallinaceans and accipi-ters, such as the American black vulture). In breeds of domestic fowl the crest takes a variety of forms (foliate, rosaceous, or nutlike). Varieties of chicken with well-developed tufts usually have no comb (for example, the Dutch and Padua hens).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

crest

[krest]
(design engineering)
The top of a screw thread.
(science and technology)
The highest point of a structure or natural formation, such as the top edge of a dam, the ridge of a roof, the highest point of a gravity wave, or the highest natural projection of a hill or mountain.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crest

crest, 2
1. A finial.
2. An ornament of a roof, a roof screen, wall, or aedicula, generally rhythmic and highly decorative, and frequently perforated; cresting.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crest

1. a tuft or growth of feathers, fur, or skin along the top of the heads of some birds, reptiles, and other animals
2. a ridge on the neck of a horse, dog, lion, etc.
3. the mane or hair growing from this ridge
4. a ridge along the surface of a bone
5. Archery identifying rings painted around an arrow shaft
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The model for crested ibis produced a training AUC value of 0.923 +- 0.006 and a testing AUC value of 0.863 +- 0.060, indicating that the MaxEnt model had high prediction accuracy.
Table III.- Variable permutation importance and percent contribution for the crested ibis suitability models.
The MaxEnt models created for crested ibis in this study were well supported and applicable to the species analyzed according to high AUC values.
Mean [Delta] values for the two crested wheatgrass populations were similar and slightly less than the western wheatgrass population (Table 3).
Yearly means, ranges, and standard error of the mean (SEM) for carbon isotope discrimination (A) and ash concentration for populations of diploid crested wheatgrass, tetraploid crested wheatgrass, and western wheatgrass half-sib families at heading stage in 1993 and 1994.
[Delta] Ash 1993 1994 1993 1994 -- % -- -- mg [g.sup.-1] -- Diploid crested wheatgrass Mean 19.3 20.3 84.7 72.9 Range 17.3-21.1 19.2-21.4 66.7-109.2 56.7-94.2 SEM 0.11 0.06 0.13 0.12 Tetraploid crested wheatgrass Mean 19.3 20.5 88.4 72.2 Range 16.2-21.3 19.4-21.4 66.8-121.0 56.7-87.4 SEM 0.15 0.06 0.17 0.1 Western wheatgrass Mean 20.3 20.7 106.6 94.1 Range 19.0-21.3 19.9-21.5 85.3-143.6 82.7-105.8 SEM 0.06 0.05 0.18 0.08
Long-term soil changes associated with seeded stands of crested wheatgrass in southeastern Alberta, Canada.
Effect of native prairie, crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn.) and Russian wildrye (Elymus junceus Fisch.) on soil chemical properties.
Mount Crested Butte, the mountain, has a base elevation of 9,100 feet.
If you want to try some powder skiing but prefer more moderate runs, Irwin Lodge, 12 miles west of Crested Butte and accessible only by snowcat or snowmobile during winter, will take you by snowcat to untracked powder runs even intermediate skiers can handle.
Through this study, we aimed to record the behavior and reproductive success of the reintroduced crested ibis, and compare reproductive parameters between the released population and the wild population in Yangxian County as reported by Yu et al.
We conducted a three-year study (from 2014 to 2016) of the breeding ecology of released crested ibis at the Dongzhai National Nature Reserve covering an area of 468 km2.