CRO


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CRO

(electronics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

CRO

(1) See conversion rate optimization.

(2) (Chief Robotics Officer) The executive responsible for integrating robots into the company for both office functions and manufacturing. It is estimated that by 2025, more than 60% of corporations worldwide will have a chief robotics officer. See robotics and AI.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, factors posing as a challenge for the growth of the CRO services market over the review period include the higher cost of labor, the exchange rate fluctuations, and the growing organizational changes in the industry.
"Our customers value our regional CRO capabilities and our local in country knowledge and leadership where we can work across and understand local cultures, customs, and regulations, and we have developed deep relationships with the key investigators in the region," said Dr Moller.
Indeed the huge amounts of venture capital currently pouring into the biotech sector--in the first half of 2018 almost $10 billion of biotech VC funding was raised--has been a positive contributing factor in the growth of recent CRO reported earnings.
'In the preclinical, as well as clinical arena, the CRO works on the ground with customers, negotiating on SOPs, costs and timelines for studies.
The 2016 CRO survey results show significant advances in the area of MRM when compared with 2015 survey results.
Despite the insights provided by Nash and Wright (2013), questions remain about the skills, knowledge, and personal characteristics needed to succeed as a CRO. In addition, the means by which individuals acquire necessary skills and experiences to excel in the role are not clearly identified, nor is the process by which an institution might best ensure a strong and diverse pool of candidates to fill the role in the future.
Though the global CRO market is facing various challenges, it is expected to grow a healthy growth rate during the forecast period owing to increase in M&A activities among the companies, increase in R&D investment by various companies, establishment of large number of clinical trial outsourcing organizations in emerging markets and increase in private equity investment particularly for R&D activities.
By enabling carriers to make "better and more informed" decisions, the CRO can help produce superior outcomes --greater revenues and profits, reduced costs, better managed and more financially resilient organizations.
Since then, the CRO role has varied across organizations in everything from finance and insurance to hedging and operational risk.
A CRO can be described as an organization/person that is contracted by a sponsor to manage various steps in the drug development process, including conduct of preclinical studies, clinical study design and execution, data management, analysis, medical writing, and regulatory submission.