computed tomography

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computed tomography

[kəm′pyüd·əd tə′mä·grə·fē]
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Modern CT scanning equipment can potentially replace multiple inspection systems and even reduce total equipment cost.
"CT scanning has improved the accuracy of our EBVs which means buyers can have increased confidence when buying these animals."
In 1992, in a retrospective study, Berk analysed the indications for CT scanning in psychiatric inpatients and concluded that there are specific clinical variables that correlated with scan abnormality.
He and colleagues Lawrence Witmer and Ryan Ridgely of Ohio University and John Horner of Montana State University used CT scanning to look inside the skulls and reconstruct the brains and nasal cavities of four different lambeosaur species.
Removal of necrotic tissue is a priority in treating the burn wound, but it may cause a significant blood loss.(1) CT findings during cardiac arrest are very infrequently reported, and the incidence of this disorder during CT scanning is, in fact, unknown.
While the use of CT scans to screen people at high risk for lung cancer remains the subject of debate, the study authors wrote that CT scanning has a slightly higher detection rate than mammography (for breast cancer screening), is cost effective and may save lives.
Although the study is a welcome foray into lung cancer screening, it doesn't establish CT scanning as an effective test, says pulmonologist Michael Unger of the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
There is a report in the September 2004 issue of Radiology that investigated the potential effect of low doses of radiation exposure from whole-body CT scanning. According to the article, the risk from routine whole-body CT scans is significant if received on a regular basis, which the article defined as once a year.
The study authors noted that "whole-body CT examinations result in much higher organ doses than those with conventional single-film x-rays." They estimated lifetime cancer mortality risk based on a representative whole-body CT scanning protocol using a multidetector CT (Siemens AG).
Their estimates of lifetime cancer mortality risk were made on the basis of a representative whole-body CT scanning protocol using a multidetector CT (Siemens AG).
A recent CT scanning survey of 200 shipyard workers revealed pleural plaques in more than 100 men.
Rather, more recent high-resolution CT scanning results suggest that our estimates of pleural abnormalities in this population may be conservative and may actually underestimate the true prevalence of these abnormalities seen on chest radiographs.