Cable Theory

(redirected from Cable equation)

Cable Theory

 

a theory used to describe the conduction of bioelectric potentials along a cylindrical cell. Cable theory proceeds from the idea that a nerve, muscle, or other cell may be represented as a section of a cable that is placed in a conducting medium and has a cell membrane that acts as an insulator. The cable model of the cylindrical cell and the theory of computation of the ratio of the magnitudes of current and voltage based on that model make possible experimental determination of the electrical parameters of the cell membrane and evaluation of the conditions of propagation of subliminal electric impulses.

REFERENCES

Katz, B. Nerv, myshtsa i sinaps. Moscow, 1968. (Translated from English.)
Khodorov, B. I. Problema vozbudimosti. Leningrad, 1969.
References in periodicals archive ?
24, 25] paid their attention to Bernstein Polynomials to solve variable order linear cable equation and variable order time fractional diffusion equation.
In addition, the proposed method can be applied by developing for the other related fractional problem, such as variable fractional order integrodifferential equation, variable order time fractional diffusion equation, and variable fractional order linear cable equation.
Medical applications described include microarray gene subset selection in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis classification, and the use of the cable equation by Morris-Lecar to simulate the cardiac cycle in diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmia.
Cable equation for a myelinated axon derived from its microstructure.
A sampling of contents: optimal signal processing for brain-machine interfaces, functional characterization of adaptive visual encoding, restoration of movement by implantable neural motor prostheses, advances in retinal neuroprosthetics, muscle synergies for motor control, cable equation model for myelinated nerve fiber, and nonlinear approaches to learning and memory.
As with the equations for parallel wires, the coaxial cable equations clearly show the same inverse relationship: reducing inductance by lowering the b/a ratio increases capacitance.