Cache County

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Cache County, Utah

179 N Main St Suite 102
Logan, UT 84321
Phone: (435) 716-7150
Fax: (435) 752-3597
www.cachecounty.org

On the central northern border of UT, northeast of Ogden; organized Jan 5, 1856 (prior to statehood) from unorganized territory. Name Origin: For Cache Valley, from the French for 'hiding place,' because early trappers or hunters stored furs and supplies in the valley

Area (sq mi):: 1173.07 (land 1164.52; water 8.55) Population per square mile: 84.20
Population 2005: 98,055 State rank: 6 Population change: 2000-20005 7.30%; 1990-2000 30.20% Population 2000: 91,391 (White 89.70%; Black or African American 0.40%; Hispanic or Latino 6.30%; Asian 2.00%; Other 5.40%). Foreign born: 6.70%. Median age: 23.90
Income 2000: per capita $15,094; median household $39,730; Population below poverty level: 13.50% Personal per capita income (2000-2003): $18,762-$20,353
Unemployment (2004): 3.90% Unemployment change (from 2000): 0.70% Median travel time to work: 16.80 minutes Working outside county of residence: 10.30%
Cities with population over 10,000:
  • Logan County seat (45,517)

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    References in periodicals archive ?
    Counties with the Highest and Lowest Median Ages in 2015 Lexington City, VA 22.4 Madison County, ID 23.2 Kusilvak Census Area, AK 23.3 Radford City, VA 23.8 Chattahoochee County, GA 24.0 Todd County, SD 24.5 Utah County, UT 24.5 Whitman County, WA 24.6 Cache County, UT 24.9 Riley County, KS 25.1 Sumter County, FL 66.6 Catron County, NM 60.1 Charlotte County, FL 58.4 Alcona County, Ml 57.9 Ontonagon County, Ml 57.3 Jefferson County, WA 57.3 Lancaster County, VA 57.1 Wheeler County, OR 56.9 Jeff Davis County, TX 56.9 Custer County, CO 56.5 Note: Only counties with a population of 1,000 or more are included in this graphic.
    Research: Investigators examined the relationship between vitamin supplementation and the risk of Alzheimer's disease among 4740 elderly residents of Cache County, UT. They classified subjects as vitamin E users if they took more than 400 IU daily and vitamin C users if they took at least 500 mg daily; more than 97% used the supplements for at least two years.