Caesarea

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Caesarea

an ancient port in NW Israel, capital of Roman Palestine: founded by Herod the Great

Caesarea

 

an ancient port city in Israel, south of Haifa, founded between 20 and 10 B.C. on the site of the Hellenistic city known as Strata’s, or Straton’s Tower. There are remains of Roman-Byzantine city walls, a hippodrome, a theater, an amphitheater, public buildings (second and third centuries A.D., court with mosaic pavement), two aqueducts, and a Byzantine basilica with mosaic floors. There are ruins of a Crusaders’ castle near the port.

References in periodicals archive ?
Caesaria already draws about 1 million tourists each year who can walk among the ruins of aqueducts and the region's oldest surviving Roman theatre.
He also undertook massive construction projects in Caesaria, Jericho, the hilltop fortress of Massada and other locations.
As well as building the walls which still stand around the old city of Jerusalem, he undertook massive construction projects in Caesaria, Jericho, the hilltop fortress of Masada and other locations.
Muslim clerics, judges, and political leaders cited a lack of Government funding for maintenance of and access to mosques in Tiberias, Safed, Beersheva, Caesaria and other places.
Beyond the city of Hadera sand dunes set in, blown by the sea winds from the old Roman port of Caesaria. The hills to the east loomed closer now, mountain and sea on a collision course.
At Caesaria, most of the residents needed wheelchair transport for safety as the staff battled huge cobblestones to take them inside an ancient Roman amphitheater.
In the tropical semi-deciduous forest, three vegetation strata are recognized: 1) the arboreal stratum (>20m height) represented by Brosimum alicastrum, Ehretia tinifolia, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Ficus cotinifolia; 2) the medium stratum (6-15m) represented by Caesaria corymbosa, Coccoloba barbadensis, and Nectandra salicifolia; and 3) the shrubby stratum, represented by Crossopetalum uragoga, Hippocratea celastroides and Jaquinia macrocarpa spp.
Moriah, the Israelites' holiest site with its power to evoke memory of a dominant Israel, or the image in Act 3 of Caesaria under siege, or in the final Act 4 the besieged Betar with its dramatic destruction, the suicide of Bar Kokhba, and the final massacre all too reminiscent of the latest pogrom in southern Russia.
Both, Strabo, the Greek scholar of the 1st century, and Eusebius, the Roman church historian and bishop of Caesaria in the 4th century, also held the view that "Moses was an Egyptian priest" who rebelled.
1042 soil/duff infrequent Amanita caesaria (Scop.) Pers.