infantile cortical hyperostosis

(redirected from Caffey disease)
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infantile cortical hyperostosis

[′in·fən‚tīl ′kȯrd·ə·kəl ‚hī·pə‚rä′stō·səs]
(medicine)
A condition occurring during the first 3 months of life in which there is fever and painful swelling of the soft tissue of the lower jaw, characterized by periosteal proliferation of the mandible.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caffey Disease in a Family and Disorders Related to Collagen Type 1
Therefore, it should be distinguished from other pathologies that cause new bone formation, including Ewing's sarcoma, Caffey disease, fibrous dysplasia, Paget's disease, osteosarcoma, and hard, nodular, or pedunculated masses seen in the mandible (peripheral osteomas, torus and exostoses, ossifying subperiosteal hematoma, etc.) [3, 4, 6, 10].
The common differential diagnosis of melorheostosis includes myositis ossificans, synovial osteochondromatosis, osteoma, parosteal osteosarcoma, focal scleroderma, and Caffey disease. Combined clinical examination and full radiological workup can accurately differentiate diagnoses.
Caffey disease, or Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis, is a rare, self=limiting disorder of unknown etiology and affecting infants, usually younger than 6 months of age.
Examples of these diagnoses include osteogenesis imperfecta, Caffey disease, rickets, congenital syphilis, hematologic abnormalities, and normal radiographic variants.