Cahokia

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Cahokia

(kəhō`kēə), village (1990 pop. 17,550), St. Clair co., SW Ill., a residential suburb of East St. Louis, on the Mississippi River; inc. 1927. The first permanent settlement in Illinois, Cahokia's name is derived from a local Native American group. The French established a mission in 1699 and a fur-trading post later. Cahokia was occupied by the British in 1765 and captured by the Americans under George Rogers ClarkClark, George Rogers,
1752–1818, American Revolutionary general, conqueror of the Old Northwest, b. near Charlottesville, Va.; brother of William Clark. A surveyor, he was interested in Western lands, served (1774) in Lord Dunmore's War (see Dunmore, John Murray, 4th earl
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 in 1778. It has several buildings dating from the 18th cent. Parks College, part of St. Louis Univ., is there. Nearby are the Cahokia MoundsCahokia Mounds,
approximately 85 surviving Native American earthworks, most in Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, SW Ill., near East St. Louis; largest group of mounds N of Mexico. Monks' Mound, a rectangular, flat-topped earthwork, 100 ft (30.
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.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout Cahokia the author's writing often drifts toward romanticism, although this does give the reader a sense of the sublime nature of the Cahokian setting and how in turn the sublimity has inspired generations of humanity.
The illustrations, particularly the pictures that show Cahokian life and architecture during the Mississippian phase, aid the reader in visualizing a complex civilization that existed in prehistoric America.
Louis, a metropolitan center built by the Cahokians arose that produced high, pyramid-like mounds different from the kinds of temples found south of the Rio Grande.
In the last two millennia, it has seen the growth and decline of the Havanna Hopewell, Late Woodland, Middle Mississippian (Cahokian) and Oneota archaeological complexes.
The Cahokians did not utilize any writing, so any information gathered from the site is gathered from its remains.
Possible impacts of early-11th-, middle-12th-, and late-13th-century droughts on western Native Americans and the Mississippian Cahokians. Quaternary Science Reviews 26(3-4):336-350.
The name Cahokia came from seventeenth century French settlers who encountered a tribe of the Illinois Confederacy the French called Cahokians living in the area.