Caiaphas


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Caiaphas

(Joseph Caiaphas) (kā`yəfəs), Jewish high priest, a Sadducee, son-in-law of Annas. According to the Gospels, he presided at the council that condemned Jesus to death. Later, he joined in the examination of Peter and John. Mat. 26.57–68; John 11.47–54; 18.24; Acts 4.6.

Caiaphas

New Testament the high priest at the beginning of John the Baptist's preaching and during the trial of Jesus (Luke 3:2; Matthew 26)
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According to a sign leading to the cave that is believed to have been Jesus' prison cell, "When these underground caves were rediscovered in 1889, their physical characteristics, their proximity to Caiaphas' palace and their continuity with the sacred pit (dungeon) all suggested the public jail, where, according to a 4th-century Jerusalem traditionJesus would have been scourged.
In effect, he was telling Caiaphas that they would one day see him, the carpenter from Nazareth, ruling over the whole of creation.
If we leave him alone, all will believe in him, and the Romans will come and take away both our land and our nation." But one of them, Caiaphas, who was high priest that year, said to them, "You know nothing, nor do you consider that it is better for you that one man should die instead of the people, so that the whole nation may not perish." He did not say this on his own, but since he was high priest for that year, he prophesied that Jesus was going to die for the nation, and not only for the nation, but also to gather into one the dispersed children of God.
Jesus' oppressors are led by head priest Caiaphas (chillingly played by Cavin Cornwall) and his associate Annas (Chicago veteran Joseph Anthony Byrd, whose striking tenor serves as counterpart to Cornwall's impressive basso profundo).
Did he have any idea when he entered the city that the countdown to Calvary had begun?" Even before Jesus arrived the people were angry - angry with Caiaphas for colluding with the Romans and angry with Pilate for being there at all.
Luke says: "It was the fifteenth year of the rule of Emperor Tiberius; Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, Herod was ruler of Galilee, and his brother Philip was ruler of the territory of Iturea and Trachonitis; Lysanias was ruler of Abilene, and Annas and Caiaphas were High Priests." Here Luke mentions seven public figures who are well-known to historians, including their geographical locations.
Bearded and hooked-nose enough to fit comfortably in a Mel Gibson film, the High Priest Caiaphas (Stephen Grief) is back in Pilate's chambers concerned about grave robbing.
The body is put in a sealed tomb to appease Jewish high priest Caiaphas (Stephen Greif), who believes the body will be stolen.
The body is sealed in a guarded tomb to appease Jewish high priest Caiaphas (Stephen Greif), who fears the body will be stolen.
Against that background, essays consider religious drama from such perspectives as performing the scriptures: biblical drama after the Reformation, preaching penance on the stage in late medieval England: the case of John the Baptist, seeing and recognizing in the sacred and new: the Latin scriptural plays of Nicholas Grimald, passion play: staging York's The Conspiracy and Christ before Annas and Caiaphas, and audience responses and the York Corpus Christi play.
The body of Yeshua is placed in a sealed tomb and Clavius stations two guards outside the heavy rock door to appease Jewish high priest Caiaphas (Stephen Greif ), who fears the body will be stolen.
The calculating Jewish leader Caiaphas (Stephen Greif) is convinced that Yeshua's disciples will try to steal the body and claim his resurrection, and so Clavius goes to secure the tomb with thick ropes and a Roman seal.