Caiaphas

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Caiaphas

(Joseph Caiaphas) (kā`yəfəs), Jewish high priest, a Sadducee, son-in-law of Annas. According to the Gospels, he presided at the council that condemned Jesus to death. Later, he joined in the examination of Peter and John. Mat. 26.57–68; John 11.47–54; 18.24; Acts 4.6.
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Caiaphas

New Testament the high priest at the beginning of John the Baptist's preaching and during the trial of Jesus (Luke 3:2; Matthew 26)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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On the page of miniatures for Prime, William depicts the judgments by Annas, Caiphas, Pilate, and Herod [Figure 7]; the judgment of Pilate is depicted on the page of miniatures for the hour of Terce [Figure 8].
The arrival of Caiphas is always a tense moment for any Jew watching a Jesus play, as he is the character who pokes a conspicuous hole in the rebuttal passed down for generations by fretful Jewish mothers to the children they feared would be accused as "Christ-killers." The ancient Jewish establishment may not have technically killed Jesus, but it seems to me they pretty enthusiastically handed them over to the people who would and pressed the issue when it looked like Pontius Pilate's resolve might weaken.
The women then depart, the soldiers awake, and the imaginative playwright inserts an 'interlude' in which they attempt explanations to Anna, Caiphas, and Pilate.
The part of Jesus was played by Pastor Larry Ovie of the Faith Christian Fellowship Church, while Fr Gerry Ferguson from the St Augustine's Parish played the High Priest Caiphas.
Once she was Sycaminum in the Jewish-Christian tradition, another time was called Caiphas, of Caiffa during the Crusades.
(8) In York's Arrest of Christ, Caiphas (Caiaphas) behaves likewise (1.
Sandy Mitchell's new Caiphas Cain novel DEATH OR GLORY (1844162877, $7.99) adds another Warhammer 40,000 adventure; this revolving around the Imperium's needs for a hero, tossing Commissioner Cain again into the spotlight in this fourth book of a popular science fiction series revolving around battles and struggles for control.
Jesus' unbiblical address to Pilate, Annas, and Caiphas and the milites' darkly comic torture are just two places where this lack is felt (110).
The Jewish priest Caiphas is a hook-nosed villain, while Pontius Pilate is a confused but decent man (hardly the despot who was recalled from his command because he was so vicious).
Skimming the surface, let's just say Caiphas the high priest (Mattia Sbragia) comes across as a simplistic, almost pantomime-like chief villain, the dissenting priests are given oneliners and short shrift and Pilate is portrayed as a doubting, almostbenevolent ruler contrary to other historical accounts which showed him to be a bit of a cold-blooded butcher.
On the program I advanced several criticisms (the seemingly unending scourging; the ludicrous portrayal of Barabbas; the representation of the high priest, Caiphas, as bloodthirsty rather than calculating, etc., etc), all of which, in retrospect, seem to me fair but beside the point.