calaverite


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calaverite

[kə′lav·ə‚rīt]
(mineralogy)
AuTe2 A yellowish or tin-white, monoclinic mineral commonly containing gold telluride and minor amounts of silver.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here the Pyrite contains inclusions of native gold and segregation of gold tellurides (Calaverite and Petzite) (Fig 3, 4, and 5).The analyses of the pyrite mono-fractions with high contents of gold (64 up to 450 g/t), underline the significant role of the pyrite as concentrator of gold in this sector.
Mineral Au Ag Pb Bi 1 Petzite 24.80 41.62 -- -- 2 Petzite 25.95 40.36 -- -- 3 Petzite 49.36 -- -- 4 Petzite 11.07 51.72 -- -- 5 Hessite 10.01 54.12 -- -- 6 Hessite 1.43 59.10 0.45 -- 7 Hessite 0.60 59.70 0.44 0.27 8 Hessite 0.12 59.81 1.41 0.10 9 Hessite -- 60.00 0.90 -- 10 Hessite 1.54 60.54 0.37 -- 11 Shtiutzite -- 54.70 0.20 -- 12 Calaverite 41.18 0.47 -- -- 13 Calaverite 43.21 -- -- -- 14 Bolinskite -- 16.67 0.36 36.02 15 Bolinskite -- 13.39 0.10 37.57 16 Bolinskite -- 18.31 -- 35.16 17 Tsumoite -- -- -- 61.65 18 Raklidzite -- 1.61 14.33 37.53 19 Altaite 0.18 0.90 57.65 1.23 20 Altaite -- 0.60 58.26 1.15 21 Altaite 0.24 1.09 58.66 0.32 No.
However, fine specimens of melonite, calaverite, sylvanite, krennerite, amethyst, and turquoise from Cripple Creek can be seen in many museums and are occasionally available to collectors.
Unlike most open cavities in the district, the Cresson vug was lined with crystals of calaverite. The gold telluride occurred as 1 to 3-mm free-standing crystals in solution cavities and as thin, fragile, leaf-like, deeply striated crystals to over 2.5 cm embedded in the less altered parts of the host rock (Patton and Wolf, 1915).
Stage II includes deposition of milky to smoky quartz, pale purple fluorite, fine-grained pyrite, specular hematite, dolomite or ankerite, celestine, barite, roscoelite, sphalerite, galena, tetrahedrite, calaverite, krennerite, sylvanite, petzite, hessite, and native gold.
Calaverite is the most common telluride in the district, occurring as a late middle-stage vein mineral (Loughlin and Koschmann, 1935; Thompson et al., 1985) and as a minor stage-two (of four) mineral of disseminated deposits at Globe Hill (Thompson et al., 1985).
It preceded and overlapped the occurrence of calaverite at the Cresson mine (Saunders, 1988).
As small, often mammillary yellowish green masses, emmonsite occurs with native gold, tellurite and partially oxidized calaverite (Lindgren and Ransome, 1906; Eckel, 1997).
Gold is uncommon as large grains, spongy masses, thin sheets, plates and grooved pseudomorphs after calaverite and other tellurides.
Hessite occurs as an early-stage mineral in microscopic, interstitial grains in calaverite in the Portland mine, where rich pyritic ore was shattered and recemented by tellurides, quartz and fluorite (Loughlin and Koschmann, 1935; Eckel, 1997).
Krennerite occurs in the vein deposits as small, vertically striated silver-white to pale brass-yellow prisms that commonly have been misidentified as sylvanite or calaverite. It may be intimately intergrown with calaverite (in parallel growth) and embedded in celestine or a "kaolin-like" material on pyritic quartz gangue (Lindgren and Ransome, 1906; Chester, 1898; Loughlin and Koschmann, 1935; Eckel, 1997).
A number of rare telluride minerals have also been available from the Fersman Museum, and include rich, nearly pure, massive black coloradoite specimens (sometimes to over 1 kg) associated with massive hessite, petzite, and occasional calaverite from Kochbulak, Uzbekistan.