calcium pyrophosphate


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Related to calcium pyrophosphate: chondrocalcinosis

calcium pyrophosphate

[′kal·se·əm ‚pī·rō′fäs‚fāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
Ca2P2O7 White, abrasive powder, used in dentifrice polishes, in metal polishes, and as a food supplement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease: nomenclature and diagnostic criteria.
Harle, "Crystal arthritides - gout and calcium pyrophosphate arthritis: Part 1: epidemiology and pathophysiology," Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie, 2017.
Idiopathic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease in a young male patient: a case report.
Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) is a condition that is characterized by the deposit of pyrophosphate crystals into tendons, ligaments, cartilage and synovium.
The keywords "treatment," "management" "guidelines" "recommendations" "colchicine" "nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs" "Anakinra" and "corticosteroids" were successively associated with the terms "deposition" "crystalinduced," "micro-crystalline," "deposition," "arthropathies," or "arthritis" and with the name of the different deposition disease (e.g., for "calcium pyrophosphate deposition" the key words "chondrocalcinosis," "calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals" and "pseudogout" were also used).
However, the physicochemical characterization and in vitro evaluation of the final properties of CPCs produced from calcium pyrophosphate powder have not been studied systematically.
Over the last decade, ultrasonography (US) has been demonstrated to be an excellent technique for detecting calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP) crystal deposits in joints and periarticular tissues [1-8], and the aspect of these deposits in hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage has been described (Figure 1).
There are various imaging features for common crystal-related deposition diseases including monosodium urate, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate as well as hydroxyapatite depositional diseases.
It illustrates the analysis of radiographic changes in a specific joint and the common arthropathies that produce these changes, then the radiographic hallmarks of each, with chapters on rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, neuropathic osteoarthropathy, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, gout, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease, hydroxyapatite deposition disease, miscellaneous deposition diseases, collagen vascular diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, and mass-like arthropathies.
Three showed monosodium urate (MSU) crystals while five had calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals.
Secondary OA may affect any joint, and causes include trauma, calcium pyrophosphate disease, rheumatoid arthritis and neuropathic arthropathy.
These opaque crystal deposits are composed of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate, reflecting an association with pseudo-gout.
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