Caldwell catalog

Caldwell catalog

[′kȯl‚dwel ¦kad·ə‚läg]
(astronomy)
A catalog of star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies for the use of amateur observers, whose objects are easy to locate with a small telescope but are not included in Messier's Catalog.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Caldwell Catalog, as that list has come to be known, comprises the target list for the only other A.L.
Of his many contributions to the field, the Caldwell Catalog may be familiar to many readers (S&T: December 1995, page 38), a collection of 109 deep-sky objects that Moore assembled as an adjunct to Messier's list.
Given its low declination and inconspicuous appearance it would, perhaps, be little-known to northern observers if not for its inclusion in two popular observing lists: the Herschel 400 and the Caldwell Catalog, as well as Walter Scott Houston's "Hydra Hysteria" tour (S&T: June and July 1991).
Among them, British astronomy popularizer Patrick Caldwell-Moore picked 109 objects for his Caldwell catalog (S&T: December 1995, page 38).
However, unlike Patrick Moore's Caldwell catalog (S&T: December 1995, page 38), my list includes a solar-system "object" (the gegenschein), as well as red carbon stars, double and triple stars, unique asterisms, galaxy clusters, and a gravitationally lensed quasar (July issue, page 108).
Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille apparently overlooked this gem during his early sweeps of the southern skies, and later Patrick Moore passed it by when compiling his Caldwell Catalog. Make sure you don't miss it!
SITED ABOUT 3[degrees] SOUTHWEST of 2nd-magnitude Gamma Cygni, near the heart of the celestial Swan, lies the 27th entry in Patrick Moore's now-famous Caldwell Catalog. Long known only as NGC 6888, the object now is commonly known as the Crescent Nebula because its brightest segment looks like the dim spirit of a thin Moon seen against the glowing clouds of the Milky Way.
The appendixes provide detailed data on the Caldwell Catalog and other information, such as the section that explains why the Double Cluster was not included in Messier's catalog.
Surprisingly, it didn't have the Caldwell Catalog to make
Since Patrick Moore published his "Caldwell Catalog" of 109 leading deep-sky objects that aren't in the Messier catalog (December 1995 issue, page 38), many errors have been found in it.
Before the trip I had prepared a detailed list of deep-sky targets using information in the Caldwell Catalog as well as from various books and periodicals.
He dubbed it the Caldwell Catalog, after his middle name, partly because M objects stand for Messier, not Moore.