Calgary

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Calgary

(kăl`gərē), city (1991 pop. 710,677), S Alta., Canada, at the confluence of the Bow and Elbow rivers. The largest city in Alberta and the fastest-growing major city in Canada, Calgary is a corporate, transportation, and financial center for Canada's oil and natural gas industries. Other industries include a mushrooming high-technology sector and flour milling, meatpacking, brewing, and lumbering. The city also is a wholesale and processing center for a large agricultural and stock-raising area.

Calgary is the site of the Univ. of Calgary, Mount Royal Univ., the Glenbow Museum, and the second largest zoo in Canada. The Calgary Stampede, inaugurated (1912) by Guy Weadick, an American trick roper, is an annual rodeo and agricultural fair. Calgary hosted the 1988 Winter Olympics and is home to the National Hockey League's Flames and the Canadian Football League's Stampeders.

The city began (1875) as the second post of the Northwest Mounted Police and expanded with the arrival (1883) of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Calgary's early economic growth was based on the burgeoning open-range cattle industry and the opening of S Alberta to cash-crop farming. The discovery (1914) of oil at Turner Valley began an expansion that ultimately spurred Calgary's late 20th and early 21st cent. growth.

Calgary

 

a city in southern Canada in Alberta Province, inthe foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Population, 400, 000(1971). Calgary is a rail and highway junction and an important industrial, trade (grain, cattle), and transportation center. Animportant factor in Calgary’s growth has been the developmentof the oil industry. Oil refineries and petrochemical, food(primarily meat-packing), machine-building, and chemical in-dustries are there, as is a university.

Calgary

a city in Canada, in S Alberta: centre of a large agricultural region; oilfields. Pop.: 879 277 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
That night, the Calgarians were guests of the Edmonton team at the Hotel du Canada, "where both teams did full justice to the good things provided by M.
Citymakers: Calgarians After the Frontier (Calgary: Historical Society of Alberta, Chinook Country Chapter, 1987), edited by Sheilagh Jameson and Max Foran, was a collection of twenty-seven biographical essays that explored the city's post-frontier experience between the first and second world wars.
"Many Aboriginal Calgarians feel they are invisible, not participating at a level which they would like to be or ought to be, a loss for the city in general," said Crowshoe.
Why, at the first indication of a potential money-maker did Calgarians invest all their money on such a risky venture?
Despite this setback, Calgarians persisted in their demands, and through their newly-elected Conservative MLA, R.B.
('Wow, wow, wow!' 'Wot's that?') As a Calgarian of many years standing, ('Lynch him!' 'Eat 'em up!' 'Tear down the throne!') I must say that we have your northern burg faded.
Started in 1998, the festival aims to provide a positive space for Calgarians, who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered, or queer to see their lives unfold on the silver screen and to celebrate their culture.
"We urge Calgarians to contact their MLA's and the Minister of Community Development to voice their support to save St.
Four days later, Calgarians saw their own mysterious object, dubbed by the press as the "Flying Dutchman of the air.(24) According to the News-Telegram, "at 12 o'clock some one thing, at an enormous height, shot straight to the north with such swiftness that in ten minutes or so it had vanished completely from sight."(25)