Calixtus II


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Related to Calixtus II: Calixtus III, Pope Honorius II

Calixtus II

Calixtus II, Callixtus II, or Callistus II, d. 1124, pope (1119–24), named Guy of Burgundy, successor of Gelasius II. The son of count William I of Burgundy, he was archbishop of Vienne during the investiture controversy with Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. When Gelasius died while in exile in France, Calixtus was consecrated pope at Vienne. He immediately summoned a large council at Reims (1119) that proceeded to anathematize the emperor and the antipope that Henry had installed (1118), Gregory VIII. Public reaction sided with the pope and the antipope was imprisoned. Henry thereupon agreed to sign (1122) the famous Concordat (see Worms, Concordat of), a compromise that recognized the rights of the church in selecting its leadership. Thus was the investiture controversy ended and the reform program of Gregory VII realized. Calixtus then called to Rome (1123) a great council in Western Europe (see Lateran Council, First) to ratify the achievements of Pope Gregory VII. He was succeeded by Honorius II.
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At the village's edge is the ruined Newton North Church, which found itself on a major pilgrim route after Pope Calixtus II declared in the 13th century that two pilgrimages to St Davids were worth one to Rome.
Such was the case in 1124, when Pope Calixtus II issued a bull in which he told the monks they did not have to pay the consuetudines that the counts of Blois, who had been the house's advocates in the middle of the eleventh century, had first demanded seventy-five years earlier.
Marrying the ultra modern to the ancient, the spa has been named The Well after the holy well at the neighbouring and now ruined Newton North Church, which found itself on a major pilgrim route after Pope Calixtus II declared in the 13th century that two pilgrimages to StDavidswere worth one to Rome.