Callias

Callias

(kăl`ēəs), fl. 449 B.C., Athenian statesman; he was related to Cimon and also to Aristides. He distinguished himself at the battle of Marathon (490 B.C.) and was a three-time winner of the Olympic chariot races. Callias was sent to Susa to negotiate for peace c.449 B.C. The result of his work was an agreement usually called the Peace of Callias (or Treaty of Callias); by it Artaxerxes IArtaxerxes I
, d. 425 B.C., king of ancient Persia (464–425 B.C.), of the dynasty of the Achaemenis. Artaxerxes is the Greek form of "Ardashir the Persian." He succeeded his father, Xerxes I, in whose assassination he had no part.
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 agreed to respect the independence of the Delian League and its members and to send no warships into Greek waters; in return Athens agreed not to interfere with Persian "influence" in Asia Minor, Cyprus, and Egypt. There is doubt that such a treaty was actually ever drawn up; however, peace did exist between Persia and the cities of Greece until the end of the century. According to ancient historians, when Callias returned to Athens he was fined 50 talents for betraying the city. Callias was also supposed to have been one of the negotiators of a treaty between Athens and Sparta (446–445 B.C.) that resulted in 30 years of peace.

Callias,

d. c.370 B.C., Athenian leader, one of the generals of the Peloponnesian War. In his old age Callias was one of the ambassadors sent to Sparta with Callistratus to negotiate a peace treaty in 371 B.C. The treaty was ineffective, and friction between EpaminondasEpaminondas
, d. 362 B.C., Greek general of Thebes. He was a pupil of Lysias the Pythagorean, but his early life is otherwise obscure. As the Theban delegate to the peace conference of 371 B.C. he refused to surrender his claim to represent all Boeotia.
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 of Thebes and Agesilaus IIAgesilaus II
, c.444–360 B.C., king of Sparta. After the death of Agis I (398? B.C.), he was brought to power by Lysander, whom he promptly ignored. After the Peloponnesian War the Greek cities in Asia Minor had not been ceded to Persia despite Sparta's promises, and in
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 of Sparta became acute. Callias was a rich man and his wealth was ridiculed by his contemporaries, including Aristophanes. His house is the scene of Xenophon's Symposium and Plato's Protagoras.
References in classic literature ?
There is at this time a Parian philosopher residing in Athens, of whom I have heard; and I came to hear of him in this way:--I came across a man who has spent a world of money on the Sophists, Callias, the son of Hipponicus, and knowing that he had sons, I asked him: 'Callias,' I said, 'if your two sons were foals or calves, there would be no difficulty in finding some one to put over them; we should hire a trainer of horses, or a farmer probably, who would improve and perfect them in their own proper virtue and excellence; but as they are human beings, whom are you thinking of placing over them?
(25) He even engages in a longish aside about a wealthy man, Callias, who pays a famous teacher to help educate his sons (APOLOGIA, pp.
Ok so gossip is evil, but did you know that Socrates was severely lampooned not just by Aristophanes in his comedic play The Clouds but also by comic poets Callias, Eupolis, Telecleid, Mnesimachus, and Ameipsias and it wasn't because of anything serious like his philosophy but because he was untidy and unkempt, even ugly?
Solamente el realismo peripatetico tomista, con la doble nocion de realidad natural y universalidad racional, es capaz de aventar la niebla espesa en que se debate el pensamiento contemporaneo; solamente la inteligencia (cuya funcion es "discernir al hombre en Callias"), puede distinguir en las obras de arte lo que permanece de lo que varia y, por consiguiente, expresar las condiciones eternas de la belleza.
The central text appealed to in the traditional view that matter is the source of numerical diversity comes at the end of Metaphysics 7.8: "And when we have the whole, such and such a form in this flesh and these bones, this is Callias or Socrates; and they are different on account of their matter, for that is different; but they are the same in form; for the form is indivisible." (7) We should understand this view's reference to "matter" as a reference to what is often called nonfunctional matter (that is, some mixture or combination of the elements) (8) rather than to functional matter (that is, parts of the organism's body--flesh and blood, or the various organs).
Plato esmenta Fedre (18) tres vegades als seus dialegs: al Protagoras se'n fa una petita allusio a 315c, en la que se'l presenta com un dels joves que escolten els discursos del sofista Hipias a casa de Callias; al Convit el seu paper es forca mes rellevant, en tant que es un dels convidats a casa d'Agato i que, a mes a mes, tria el fil central dels discursos que es pronunciaran (19), dels quals ell mateix ofereix el primer; al Fedre, per contra, es l'interlocutor principal-i unic--de Socrates.
She was the daughter of Miltiades, sister of Cimon, wife of Callias, and linked in a number of anecdotes to Pericles.
It has a coherent literary genealogy, one that Saint-Amand situates in a number of practical, cultural, and literary ties, practices, and "sociabilities" ranging from friendship (cf., the morbid, if deliriously hilarious, anecdote concerning Jean Keck, Ernest Cabaner, a shared pair of clothes and an apartment fire, 51-52); salons such as those of Nina de Callias and Antoine Cros; and, last but not least, what the author refers to perspicaciously as the "nebuleuse Parnassienne i.e., a complex, loosely affiliated movement whose poetic and socio-political diversity resists simple reduction to what is by now a surely familiar heuristic Procrustean bed of, among other things, "impassibility" and "social disengagement" (54-61).
For instance, 'the physician does not cure a man, except in some incidental way, but Callias or Socrates or some other called by some such individual name, who happens to be a man'.