Callistratus


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Callistratus

(kəlĭs`trətəs), d. c.360 B.C., Athenian statesman and orator. Believing Thebes to be more dangerous to Athens than Sparta, he favored a peace with Sparta. He and CalliasCallias,
d. c.370 B.C., Athenian leader, one of the generals of the Peloponnesian War. In his old age Callias was one of the ambassadors sent to Sparta with Callistratus to negotiate a peace treaty in 371 B.C.
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 in 371 B.C. were the delegates to negotiations on an ineffective peace treaty. His failure to check Thebes led to his impeachment in 366 B.C., but he saved himself with his brilliant defense—an oration that is supposed to have inspired Demosthenes to study rhetoric. After new failure he fled Athens and was condemned in absentia for having urged Athens to allow Thebes to occupy Oropus in Boetia. When he returned he was put to death.
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Philostratus the Elder, Philostratus the Younger, and Callistratus.
Philostratus the Elder, Imagines; Philostratus the Younger, Imagines; Callistratus, Descriptions.
barbatus rigido nupsit Callistratus Afro hac qua leqe viro nubere virgo solet praeluxere faces, velarunt flammea vultus, nec tua defuerunt verba, Thalasse, tibi dos etiam dicta est.
Aristotle and Callistratus both discuss a statue of Diana that moved on its own (Callistratus described the source of its movement as mechanical, whereas Aristotle maintains it was animated by quicksilver) (Cohen 1617).
Two appendices describe junius's important use of some classical authors not read by Sidney: "Longinus," Callistratus, and the Philostrati.
In the late 19th century, Dr Callistratus is the governor of a brutal penal institution in a remote castle.
Callistratus, Florentinus, Licinius Rufinus y Tertullianus.
The Athenian orator and general Callistratus said it could quiet "attacks of wild distraction and hot-bloodedness.
Thus, he introduces his first such example as follows: 'as Leodamas said when he was accusing Callistratus, that the one giving the advice did more wrong than the one who carried it out .
118) Like the wax in the picture of Ino and Athamas, which beguiles the senses ([LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) by giving the impression of being tossed about by the wind and becoming moist in imitation of the sea, that is, by appropriating the sea's characteristic qualities (see Callistratus, Descr.
1, discussing the Eros of Praxiteles, as a `sacred work of art', Callistratus proclaims
17 So far as I can tell, no names of artists are ever mentioned in the collection of Imagines by the Philostratuses and Callistratus, while the literary sources are frequently cited.