Cambyses


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Related to Cambyses: royal road, Darius the Great, XERXES

Cambyses

Cambyses (kămbīˈsēz), two kings of the Achaemenid dynasty of Persia. Cambyses I was king (c.600 B.C.) of Ansham, ruling as a vassal of Media. According to Herodotus he married the daughter of the Median king Astyages; some scholars dispute this. Cambyses' son was Cyrus the Great. Cambyses II, d. 521 B.C., was the son and successor of Cyrus the Great and ruled as king of ancient Persia (529–521 B.C.). He disposed of his brother Smerdis in order to gain unchallenged rule. He invaded Egypt, defeating (525 B.C.) Psamtik at Pelusium and sacking Memphis. His further plans of conquest in Africa were frustrated, and at home an impostor claiming to be Smerdis raised a revolt. Cambyses died, possibly by suicide, when he was putting down the insurrection. Darius I succeeded him.
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Cambyses

had a venal judge put to death and the body skinned as covering for his judgment seat. [Gk. Hist.: Herodotus in Magill III, 479]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cambyses

died ?522 bc, king of Persia (529--522 bc), who conquered Egypt (525); son of Cyrus the Great
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Cambyses II was his son and pursued his father's dream of regional rule.
The city was not mistreated at all; instead traditional religious festivals were fully restored by Gobryas, a trend continued by Cyrus and his son Cambyses after they later entered the city.
Preston's tragedy is an adaptation of the story of the Persian king Cambyses II, who, as Herodotus recounts in book 3 of his Histories, reigned from 529 to 522 BCE.
(23) Here we might think of Dame Chat and Scapethrift from Gammer Gurton's Needle; of Ambidexter, the Vice, from Cambyses; and of such figures as Master Lust, Inclination, Greedy-Gut, and Trust in The Trial of Treasure.
Indeed 'Cambyses vein' was familiar enough to a playhouse audience to be alluded to in Shakespeare's 1 Henry IV in the late 1590s." (27) As late as 1609 Thomas Dekker cited the play when addressing "How a Gallant should behave him selfe in a Play-house": "on the very Rushes where the Commedy is to daunce, yea and under the state of Cambises himselfe must our fethered Estridge [ostrich] like a peece of Ordnance be planted valiantly." (28) The play's modern editor asks, "Does not this reference suggest that Cambises was sharing the stage with Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Dekker?" (29)
According to Herodotus, the invasion of Ethiopia by the Persian king Cambyses was exploratory in nature (Hdt.
The Sesostrises, Assurbanipal and the Cambyses were the crowned representatives of the bank and monopolies of the time, as were Dupleix and Clive in India in the last century, and as are, in our century, the powers divvying up Africa" (Reclus, 1905a, page 488).
When King Psammenitus of Egypt is conquered by Cambyses, he weeps not at the murder of his son or the enslavement of his daughters but at the ruin of one of his advisers who "has lost all and become a beggar when he is upon the threshold of old age" (3.14).
King Cambyses a judge issued a warrant for bribery had been killed by skinning [12].
Zerubbabel and Joshua hold commissions under Cyrus's successors Cambyses (530/529-522 B.C.E.) and Darius (522-486 B.C.E.), (cf.