Cameralism

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Cameralism

 

a special program of studies of administrative and economic disciplines taught in European universities in the Middle Ages and in the universities of Russia from the 1850’s. In Germany, for example, this program included economic, geographic, and other subjects. Cameralism received its name from the cameral managements established in the Middle Ages by princes, dukes, and kings with extensive business activities. The so-called cameral disciplines were taught at special university departments and special schools (cameral schools) for the training of bureaucrats and administrators for the affairs of the high feudal lords; disciplines taught included mainly mining, forestry, and agricultural sciences. Marx characterized cameralism as “a medley of smatterings, through whose purgatory the hopeful candidate for the German bureaucracy has to pass” (K. Marx and F. Engels, Sock, 2nd ed., vol. 23, p. 13).

References in periodicals archive ?
(1987) "The Cameralists: A Public Choice Perspective", Public Choice, 53: 3-20.
Within this discourse, "police" served as a referent, if not a synonym, for the regulatory instruments of continental cameralist regimes.
The daughter of Heinrich von Justi, a controversial and prolific cameralist, she was reputedly one of a handful of eighteenth-century German women to be awarded a university degree.
Further, Kaufman argues that Kant's critique of state paternalism needs to be situated in its historical context as a polemic against the Cameralist tradition of German political economy.
These shifts reflect the influence of mercantilist and cameralist thinking which argued that the health of populations was a key aspect to the health of the state.
Cameralist writers interpreted economics as household economy in the Aristotelian sense, in which patriarchal authority defined and dominated property relations, and subordinated it to what was called Polizeiwissenschaft, i.e.
Firstly, state intervention and regulation became increasingly intrusive: Cameralist and early Enlightenment thinking in government led to an intensification of external control; subsequent attempts to apply Physiocratic ideas motivated some rulers to try and encourage the Jews to abandon traditional trades and occupations and engage in more fundamentally useful, and Christian, occupations such as agriculture.
Government's primary role changed from managing a king's estates (the source of early cameralist studies) to protecting rights and liberties -- especially the right of property, which is the basis for a modern free-market capitalist economy -- and to dealing with trade, international affairs, and defense.
They could not be members of the government or the Reichstag or any state or local cabinet or parliament.(31) Because the board was composed primarily of businessmen who opposed the government's interventionist policies and who rejected traditional cameralist management methods, it became the lightning rod for the government's criticism of the railway and, along with Leverve, the driving force behind the Reichsbahn's reforms.
The cameralist roots of Menger are discussed by Paul Silverman.