Campylobacter enteritis


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Campylobacter enteritis

[kam¦pī·lə‚bak·tər ‚en·tə′rīd·əs]
(medicine)
A water-borne gastroenteritis caused by Campylobacter jejune.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Campylobacter enteritis associated with foodborne transmission.
Campylobacter enteritis from untreated water in the Rocky Mountains.
Previously identified risk factors for Campylobacter enteritis include international travel; ingestion of poultry, red meat, unpasteurized milk, and untreated water; contact with pets and farm animals; use of antimicrobial drugs and acid-suppressing medication; and diabetes (3-11).
Numerous studies implicate chicken consumption as an important risk factor for Campylobacter enteritis (6-18).
We have presented new estimates of the absolute and relative risk for well-described complications such as HUS after EHEC infection, GBS after an episode of Campylobacter enteritis, and reactive arthritis after Yersinia enteritis.
Waterborne outbreak of Campylobacter enteritis after outdoors infantry drill in Utti, Finland.
Hospital microbiology laboratories routinely report all Campylobacter enteritis cases to the regional public health department.
Campylobacter enteritis is primarily a foodborne illness; poultry is the major source for human infection (1).
This estimate suggests that in 1999, approximately half a million people in the UK became ill with campylobacter enteritis.
The only form of campylobacteriosis of major public health importance is Campylobacter enteritis due to C.
In Belgium, Campylobacter enteritis (campylobacteriosis) is mainly caused by Campylobacter jejuni (80% of the isolates) and C.
Most cases of Campylobacter enteritis do not require antimicrobial treatment, being brief, clinically mild, and self-limiting (2-4).