Campylobacter

(redirected from Campylobacter infections)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

Campylobacter

[‚kam·pə·lə′bak·tər]
(microbiology)
A genus of bacteria in the family Spirillaceae; spirally curved rods that are motile by means of a polar flagellum at one or both poles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poultry meat, and its products are considered as the common source of Campylobacter infection in humans (PEZZOTTI et al., 2003; PEREZ-BOTO et al., 2010; DUARTE et al., 2014; BOLTON, 2015; WIECZOREK & OSEK, 2015; ZHONG et al., 2016), but also cattle may play an important role for human campylobacteriosis.
Association between Campylobacter infection and Guillain-Barre syndrome.
Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicates that puppies sold through the commercial dog industry, an uncommon source of Campylobacter outbreaks, were the source of a multistate outbreak of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter infections. This evidence, combined with the prolonged nature of the outbreak and the potential for puppy commingling, indicates a potential for continued transmission of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter industrywide, including at breeders, distributors, transporters, and stores, and ultimately in customers' homes.
Though not used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections in young children, this scenario shows that Tc has lost all its utility in the treatment of Campylobacter spp.
Host-Pathogen Interactions in Campylobacter Infections: the Host Perspective.
Various strains of Campylobacter are of potential concern and risk analysis studies have shown evidence that pet ownership has been linked to Campylobacter infections in humans, including direct evidence of transmission of a Campylobacter jejuni strain between a human and a dog living in the same household (Damborg, Olsen, M [phi] ller Nielsen, & Guardabassi, 2004).
FoodNet determined that, in addition to various other strains of foodborne bacteria and viruses, campylobacter infection was found in 14.3 people per 100,000.
BOSTON -- Thirty percent of individuals with a history of Salmonella or Campylobacter infections reported ongoing postinfectious symptoms as long as 10 years after the initial infectious event, according to Paul Enck, Ph.D., who presented the results in a poster at the meeting.
Campylobacter infections in humans are a major cause of bacterial foodborne illness.
In almost all developed countries the incidence of human campylobacter infections has been steadily increasing for several years, while it has continued to wax and wane in the UK.
Epidemiology of Campylobacter infections in the United States and other industrialized nations.
The report highlights "specific concern about bacterial resistance to antibiotics used in the treatment of Salmonella and Campylobacter infections."

Full browser ?