infectious canine hepatitis

(redirected from Canine adenovirus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms.
Related to Canine adenovirus: Canine parvovirus, Canine adenovirus 1

infectious canine hepatitis,

acute viral disease of canines, especially dogs and foxes. The causative agent, an adenovirus, is not infectious to humans. In foxes the disease is manifested primarily as encephalitis. Transmission occurs mainly by direct contact with infected animals. The virus can be passed through the urine for periods of up to one year. Dogs of any age are susceptible to the disease. The incubation period is from six to nine days, and the signs are fever, loss of appetite, congested mucous membranes, and pain in the region of the liver. Mortality is about 10%, and about 25% of the survivors develop a temporary corneal opacity (hepatitis blue eye). Treatment consists of the administration of intravenous fluids, antibiotics, and vitamins. Recent reports indicate that chronic infection may occur, leading to cirrhosis of the liver. Annual vaccination with a modified live virus will give permanent prevention.

infectious canine hepatitis

[in′fek·shəs ′kā‚nīn ‚hep·ə′tīd·əs]
(veterinary medicine)
An acute inflammatory liver disease of dogs caused by a virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cavanagh, "Molecular cloning and restriction endonuclease mapping of two strains of canine adenovirus type 2," Journal of General Virology, vol.
AB303301) showed that RV1 was homologous to tree shrew adenovirus 1 (70.0% amino acid sequence identity), porcine adenovirus 5 (69.2%), canine adenovirus 1 (68.9%), human adenoviruses-3, -16, -21 and -50 (68.9%), and other viruses (>64.8%) in genus Mastadenovirus, but less homologous (46.7%-57.8%) to viruses in other genuses, Siadenovi rus, Aviadenovirus, and Atadenovirus.
Schultz considers the following vaccines to be the "core" (or basic) vaccines that every dog should receive: canine distemper (CDV), canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2), canine adenovirus 2 (CAV), and rabies.
Virologic and bacteriologic investigations on the parenchymatous organs did not detect common canine pathogens, notably canine parvovirus type 2, canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2.