Cannae


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Cannae

(kăn`ē), ancient village, Apulia, SE Italy, scene in 216 B.C. of HannibalHannibal
, b. 247 B.C., d. 183 or 182 B.C. Carthaginian general, an implacable and formidable enemy of Rome. Although knowledge of him is based primarily on the reports of his enemies, Hannibal appears to have been both just and merciful. He is renowned for his tactical genius.
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's crushing defeat of the Romans. Hannibal's troops assumed a crescent-shaped formation to meet the Roman troops, which were especially concentrated in the center. As the Romans advanced, Hannibal by brilliant strategy managed to encircle the entire Roman force and cut it to pieces.

Cannae

 

village in southeastern Italy on the Aufidus River (modern Ofanto River) near which, on Aug. 2, 216 B.C., occurred the largest battle of the Second Punic War, between the Roman Army commanded on the day of battle by Consul Terentius Varro and Hannibal’s Carthaginian Army. The Roman Army comprised 80, 000 infantry and 6, 000 cavalry, of which 63, 000 infantry and all the cavalry participated in the battle; the Carthaginian Army comprised 40, 000 infantry and 10, 000 cavalry. The Roman infantry, in a deep and dense battle formation, attacked the center of the Carthaginian forces and pushed them back. But the Carthaginian cavalry crushed the Roman cavalry on the flanks, whereupon the Roman infantry was surrounded and virtually wiped out. The Roman losses were 48, 000 killed and 10, 000 taken prisoner; the Carthaginians lost 6, 000.

After the defeat of the Roman Army, many southern Italian and Sicilian cities defected to Hannibal’s side. However, owing to the lack of forces, Hannibal was unable to take advantage of the victory and move against Rome. The battle of Cannae is an outstanding example of the art of warfare. “Never before had an entire army been so completely crushed” (F. Engels, Izbr. voen. proizvedeniia, 1956, p. 211).

REFERENCES

Razin, E. A. Istoriia voennogo iskusstva, vol. 1. Moscow, 1955.
Strokov, A. A. Istoriia voennogo iskusstva, vol. 1. Moscow, 1955.
Del’briuk, G. Istoriia voennogo iskusstva v ramkakh politicheskoi istorii, vol. 1. Moscow, 1936.
Shliffen, A. Kanny, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1938.

Cannae

perhaps Hannibal’s greatest victory (216 B.C.). [Rom. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 48]
See: Battle

Cannae

an ancient city in SE Italy: scene of a victory by Hannibal over the Romans (216 bc)
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A diversified holding company, Cannae has over USD1bn in book value in assets and invests in a diverse range of assets.
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FNF is currently structured as a pure title insurance company with a $100 million investment in Cannae. Fitch expects that any non-title related investments will take place at Cannae and not expose FNF's balance sheet to credit risk other than the aforementioned investment.
For example, Adrian Goldsworthy has published an excellent book on Cannae (Cannae: Hannibal's Greatest Victory, Phoenix Press, 2007) and another on the entire struggle between Rome and Carthage (The Fall of Carthage: The Punic Wars 265-146BC, Cassel, 2002).
Shoppers at Barnes & Noble may encounter "this brilliant, long-overdue, and beautifully written" tome (according to the publisher's blurb) detailing Hannibal's annihilation of a Roman army at Cannae in southeast Italy on 2 August 216 BC during the Second Punic War [218-201 BC], the classic example of tactical double envelopment.
In this spring of 216 BC he had marched south, crossing the River Aufidus, and occupying the town of Cannae, which was an important grain depot for the Romans.
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Armed then with such information, the armchair theorist or wargamer should be able to argue like an expert about such battles as Cannae, Zama, Magnesia or Pharsalus.
They consider such aspects as the encomium as aestheticization of power, linking the Saguntum and Cannae episodes in Silius Italicus' Punica, and the unity of Martial's metres.