Canopicjar

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Canopicjar

 

(1) In ancient Egypt, four tall vessels (made of alabaster, faience, or other material), in which the viscera of the deceased—which had been removed during the process of mummification—were placed. The lids of the canopic jars were made in the shape of the heads of the sons of the god Horus (the baboon-headed Hapi, the human-headed Imset, the hawk-headed Qebhsnuf, and the jackal-headed Duamutef). The jars were placed in a special box having reliefs of the goddess-protectresses of the canopic jars: Isis, Nephthys, Mut, and Neith.

(2) In ancient Etruria (Italy), an urn in which the ashes were stored after cremation of the corpse. The Etruscan canopic jar was rounded or oval and had two handles, sometimes a high pedestal, and a lid in the form of a human head.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.