Canterbury Tales


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Chaucer, Geoffrey

Chaucer, Geoffrey (jĕfˈrē chôˈsər), c.1340–1400, English poet, one of the most important figures in English literature.

Life and Career

The known facts of Chaucer's life are fragmentary and are based almost entirely on official records. He was born in London between 1340 and 1344, the son of John Chaucer, a vintner. In 1357 he was a page in the household of Prince Lionel, later duke of Clarence, whom he served for many years. In 1359–60 he was with the army of Edward III in France, where he was captured by the French but ransomed.

By 1366 he had married Philippa Roet, who was probably the sister of John of Gaunt's third wife; she was a lady-in-waiting to Edward III's queen. During the years 1370 to 1378, Chaucer was frequently employed on diplomatic missions to the Continent, visiting Italy in 1372–73 and in 1378. From 1374 on he held a number of official positions, among them comptroller of customs on furs, skins, and hides for the port of London (1374–86) and clerk of the king's works (1389–91). The official date of Chaucer's death is Oct. 25, 1400. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Early Works

Chaucer's literary activity is often divided into three periods. The first period includes his early work (to 1370), which is based largely on French models, especially the Roman de la Rose and the poems of Guillaume de Machaut. Chaucer's chief works during this time are the Book of the Duchess, an allegorical lament written in 1369 on the death of Blanche, wife of John of Gaunt, and a partial translation of the Roman de la Rose.

Italian Period

Chaucer's second period (up to c.1387) is called his Italian period because during this time his works were modeled primarily on Dante and Boccaccio. Major works of the second period include The House of Fame, recounting the adventures of Aeneas after the fall of Troy; The Parliament of Fowls, which tells of the mating of fowls on St. Valentine's Day and is thought to celebrate the betrothal of Richard II to Anne of Bohemia; and a prose translation of Boethius' De consolatione philosophiae.

Also among the works of this period are the unfinished Legend of Good Women, a poem telling of nine classical heroines, which introduced the heroic couplet (two rhyming lines of iambic pentameter) into English verse; the prose fragment The Treatise on the Astrolabe, written for his son Lewis; and Troilus and Criseyde, based on Boccaccio's Filostrato, one of the great love poems in the English language (see Troilus and Cressida). In Troilus and Criseyde, Chaucer perfected the seven-line stanza later called rhyme royal.

The Canterbury Tales

To Chaucer's final period, in which he achieved his fullest artistic power, belongs his masterpiece, The Canterbury Tales (written mostly after 1387). This unfinished poem, about 17,000 lines, is one of the most brilliant works in all literature. The poem introduces a group of pilgrims journeying from London to the shrine of St. Thomas à Becket at Canterbury. To help pass the time they decide to tell stories. Together, the pilgrims represent a wide cross section of 14th-century English life.

The pilgrims' tales include a variety of medieval genres from the humorous fabliau to the serious homily, and they vividly indicate medieval attitudes and customs in such areas as love, marriage, and religion. Through Chaucer's superb powers of characterization the pilgrims—such as the earthy wife of Bath, the gentle knight, the worldly prioress, the evil summoner—come intensely alive. Chaucer was a master storyteller and craftsman, but because of a change in the language after 1400, his metrical technique was not fully appreciated until the 18th cent. Only in Scotland in the 15th and 16th cent. did his imitators understand his versification.

Bibliography

The best editions of Chaucer's works are those of F. N. Robinson (1933) and W. W. Skeat (7 vol., 1894–97); of The Canterbury Tales, that of J. M. Manly and E. Rickert (8 vol., 1940); of Troilus and Criseyde, that of R. K. Root (1926).

See C. Muscatine, Chaucer and the French Tradition (1960); G. G. Coulton, Chaucer and His England (1950, repr. 1963); M. A. Bowden, A Reader's Guide to Geoffrey Chaucer (1964); G. G. Williams, A New View of Chaucer (1965); M. Hussey et al., Introduction to Chaucer (1965); D. W. Robertson, Jr., Chaucer's London (1968); G. L. Kittredge, Chaucer and His Poetry (1915, repr. 1970); I. Robinson, Chaucer's Prosody (1971) and Chaucer and the English Tradition (1972); P. M. Kean, Chaucer and the Making of English Poetry (2 vol., 1972); D. Brewer, ed., Chaucer: The Critical Heritage (2 vol., 1978); B. Rowland, ed., Companion to Chaucer Studies (1979); D. R. Howard, Chaucer: His Life, His Works, His World (1989). Bibliographies for 1908 to 1953 by D. D. Griffith (rev. ed. 1954) and for 1954 to 1963 by W. R. Crawford (1967).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

Canterbury Tales

pilgrimage from London to Canterbury during which tales are told. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales]
See: Journey
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scala's first chapter, '"We Witen Nat What Thing We Preyen Heere': Desire, Knowledge, and the Ruse of Satisfaction in the Knight's Tale," comments not only on the frustrated desires of characters in the "Knight's Tale," but also references Chaucer's act of appropriating source material and reappropriating his own previously penned "Palamon and Arcite" into the Canterbury Tales. This act of "suturing" another story into the Canterbury Tales not only "[alters] the romance he formerly wrote" but also "[crafts] a particularized response and aggressive reading of it" (84).
Dr Sue Niebrzydowski, of Bangor University's School of English, said: "It has been an absolute pleasure to have been involved in a project that has made such digital images of this important copy of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales freely available to all.
Grimm Fairy Tales and The Canterbury Tales are performed at The Dome, Grand Central Hall, Renshaw Street, tomorrow.
On the other hand Canterbury Tales, 'Allo 'Allo and each of our pantomimes have been great fun.
It gives sigil, shelf-mark, and repository for every manuscript of the Canterbury Tales. For those of them containing the tale, it also gives their tale order and textual affiliation as established by John Manly and Edith Rickert (1940), in addition to offering select details about their present condition and production circumstances.
A performance of Canterbury Tales, at Speke Hall, as part of the outdoor theatre season Picture: GARETH JONES/ grj200711spekehall-4
For those who have yet to discover the joys of The Canterbury Tales, it is an open invitation to further reading.
This annotated edition of the Tale of Gamelyn, a tale found in twenty five of the eighty-four extant manuscripts or fragments of the Canterbury Tales, represents the culmination of many years' work by Nila VAzquez on the transcription and analysis of the tale in ten of those manuscripts.
Vazquez approaches the text somewhat differently, since the title of the book under review seems to suggest that she considers Gamelyn in the context of Chaucer's magnum opus: The "Tale of Gamelyn" of "The Canterbury Tales" (my emphasis).
The main draw is the spectacular cathedral where St Thomas Becket was killed in 1170 - an event that's pulled in pilgrims ever since, as regaled in Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. A weekend in this beautiful, unique, living monument is the perfect way to bring history to life.
This article covers some ways of exploring The General Prologue, Chaucer's narrative frame device for the bigger collection of tales that The Canterbury Tales constitutes, but why stop there when the tales themselves are so good?