Cantharophily

Cantharophily

 

the cross-pollination of flowers by beetles that feed on the pollen or on some of the juicy tissues of the flower. Special suitability for cantharophily is generally not ob-served among flowers and beetles. Full, or true, cantharophily is inherent in only a few plants (for example, cycads and calycanths).

References in periodicals archive ?
Pollination ecology of Syagrus smithii (Arecaceae), a palm with cantharophily from Colombian Amazon
The pollination syndromes encountered in the plant community included: melittophily (65.2%), phalenophily (13%, including here flowers pollinated by sphingids and nocturnal moths), chiropterophily (11%), ornithophily (6.5%), as well as cantharophily and psychophily (4.3% each).
The syndromes of psychophily and cantharophily were represented by only a single species each, and these were observed flowering only during the rainy season.
Three entomophilous syndromes are recurrent among palms: (i) bee pollination (melliotophily), involving the genera Melipona, Apis and Trigona; (ii) beetle pollination (cantharophily), involving mostly Nitidulidae, Staphylinidae and Curculionidae; and (iii) fly pollination (myophily), involving families Calliphoridae, Syrphidae, and Drosophilidae, characteristic of some understory palm species.