canto

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Related to Cantus: cantus firmus

canto

a main division of a long poem
References in periodicals archive ?
Live performance by the women's choir Cantus Novus Femina of the Epilogi Cultural Movement of Limassol and the Concordia String Quartet.
Cantus male choir, Timothy Cheek, Sonja Kaye Thompson--piano four hands.
When the soprano voices and oboes enter with the chorale melody in half-notes, the rest of the vocal ensemble supports the cantus firmus in block homophony and is joined with a return of the lively ritornello material in the violins.
Among the premier men's vocal ensembles in the United States, Cantus will perform a program of anthems from around the world, written by a wide variety of composers and styles and ranging in time from the Renaissance to the 21st century.
Cantus features six pieces by three influential contemporary classical composers: Arvo Part, Steve Reich, and Hywel Davies.
On Sunday, S4C and Radio Cymru's Dilwyn Morgan hosts the mixed section with Cantus Polonicum, Cavan Singers, Cor Godre'r Garth, Ger y Ffin, Holme Valley Singers and University of Lancaster.
Bridget Riley's Cantus Firmus 1972-73 is instantly recognisable as a Riley, as the eyes start to blur, and Peter Davies's Small Touching Squares Painting is made up of lots of tiny blobs of colour which shows admirable sticking power.
The concert will also see participation from the a-cappella classical Cantus choir and the more jazzy a-cappella singers Blue Fever.
God wants us to love him eternally with our whole hearts--not in such a way as to injure or weaken our earthly love, but to provide a kind of cantus firmus to which the other melodies of life provide the counterpoint.
Best known for Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten, his musical scores have been pervaded by bell-like sounds since the musical breakthrough to poetic expression called "tintinnabular" style.
The Ars practica mensurabilis cantus (formerly known as Libellus cantus mensurabilis), ascribed to him in more than fifty manuscripts, is the earliest complete statement of the theory, which became the foundation of the system of rhythmic notation that prevailed until around 1600.
Readers not thoroughly familiar with the ideas and content of those specific works will find it difficult to appreciate the full significance of the argument but the cantus firmus of Luther's thought is readily apparent throughout.