Cantus Firmus

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Cantus Firmus

 

a melody borrowed from any secular or religious work or specially created and used as the basis for a polyphonic musical composition. The method of cantus firmus developed in Western European music in the 12th century, became particularly widespread in the 16th, and began losing its importance in the 17th.

References in periodicals archive ?
I believe that when other `foreign' cantus firmi in superius parts are identified they will be found to share the same variety of treatment as their equivalents in tenor parts.
The editor points out that examples of word-painting are fewer in the five-, six- and seven-part motets than in the four-part ones of the earlier collection; the reason could be that, writing there for fewer voices, Maillard was not unduly hampered by cantus firmi (p.
Macey provides references to the modern editions of these excluded works in the endnotes to the edition's introduction, and excerpts and cantus firmi from these motets appear as musical examples in Bonfire Songs.
His publications of chant books and his building of Masses on chant cantus firmi make Cardoso an exemplary servant of the church who happened - to look at it in thoroughly 20th-century terms - to be living in the very late Renaissance.
As musicians who understood the plainchant repertory from teaching it and from singing cantus firmi, the tenors would have been the more disciplined performers, with the best understanding of the music they sang every day.
The use of various cantus firmi helps here, of course, but Penalosa furthers his cause by making his cantus firmi unusually inconspicuous in the texture.
Appendixes provide plainsongs used as cantus firmi, brief descriptions and bibliographies for each source, and a thorough textual commentary.
1 [F] and Wolfenbuttel, Herzog-August Bibliothek, Helmstedt 1099 [W2] (Wolfenbuttel, Herzog-August Bibliothek, Helmstedt Con [W1], which is, of course, accounted for in the transcriptions and the commentary, is not identified in the table of contents, though it contains forty percent of these compositions), of four clausulae in F (one of which is also in W1) on segments of cantus firmi not known to have been "organized" for three voices, and of fourteen compositions for three voices from other manuscripts (mostly Montpellier, Faculte de medecine, H 196 [Mo] and Bamberg, Staatliche Bibliothek, Lit.
Eliminating variations caused by musica ficta, in turn, can assist researchers in identifying borrowed melodic material, contrafacta and concordances, and voices built on cantus firmi.
Robin Leaver's "Bach and the German Agnus Dei" explores the historical associations of the chorale cantus firmi incorporated into the Kyrie of the F-major Mass (BWV 233).