canyon

(redirected from Canyons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms.
Related to Canyons: Submarine Canyons

canyon

, cañon
a gorge or ravine, esp in North America, usually formed by the down-cutting of a river in a dry area where there is insufficient rainfall to erode the sides of the valley
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

canyon

See Mars, surface features; valley, lunar.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Canyon

 

a deep river valley with very steep, often perpendicular, walls and a narrow floor, usually completely occupied by theriverbed. One of the largest canyons in the world is the GrandCanyon of the Colorado River in the USA (length, over 320 km;depth, to 1, 800 m).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

canyon

[′kan·yən]
(geography)
A chasm, gorge, or ravine cut in the surface of the earth by running water; the sides are steep and form cliffs.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grand Canyon West, located on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, is home of The Skywalk.
The data provided by Cassini later revealed that the liquid-filled channels on the moon were narrow canyons generally less than half a mile wide and 790 to 1,870 feet deep.
Byline: Tom Johnstone, co-founder and canyon guide at Canyon Wales
The GMC Canyon pickup truck is sizable, powerful, capable and attractively styled for 2015, but it's still smaller than a full-size, half-ton truck.
In this study, a three-dimensional CFD model was used to better understand the pollutant transport process and distribution patterns in the street canyons with three different kinds of configuration.
Rock of ages it may be, but the Grand Canyon's age itself is under fire.
Fortunately, in the side canyons of Grand Canyon, tamarisk is on its way out.
As at Osaka, a wavy roofed concourse building is incised by multistorey canyons and linked to a single, immensely long pier that contains the boarding gates.
You're about to embark on a vacation like no other: rafting the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. You'll hop into big motorized rafts or four-person rowboats at Lees Ferry, the shore of a wide part of the river that marks the dividing line between Glen and Grand Canyons.
It's 186 miles long and has almost 2,000 miles of shoreline littered with around 100 canyons.
During his historic exploration of the Grand Canyon in 1869, John Wesley Powell wrote in his diary, "The thought grew in my mind that the canyons of this region would be a Book of Revelations in the rock-leaved bible of geology." Today, geologists know that the canyon began to be eroded 4 million years ago and that the strata thus exposed reveal a 1.75-billion-year span of the Earth's history.