Canzonet


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Canzonet

 

in the 16th and 17th centuries, a short polyphonic song; in the 18th century, also a solo strophic song, often with dance elements. The canzonet genre began in Italy. Nineteenth-century composers sometimes called instrumental pieces “canzonets” (for example, the middle movement of Tchaikovsky’sConcerto for Violin).

References in periodicals archive ?
With this volume in Recent Researches in the Music of the Classical Era, Rubin reintroduces John Travers's superb Eighteen Canzonets for Two and Three Voices (London: John Simpson, 1746), written for various combinations of two or three voice parts and continuo.
The "encomium" on Novello's unassuming canzonet is preceded by distinctly unfavorable and hostile reviews of music by John Field and Ludwig van Beethoven.
The CD title, "Recollection", is also the title of one of the English canzonets, and Jankova explains that she chose it to express how one can share in the revival of forgotten beauty.
Although at first he put aside his love for his neighbor's wife and gave up one or two of his other vices, nevertheless in the course of time, without abandoning the habit of his order, he reverted to his former ways; and he began to take a pride in his appearance, wear expensively tailored cassocks, affect an air of sprightliness and elegance in all his doings, compose canzonets and sonnets and ballades, sing various songs, and engage in coundess other activities of a similar nature.
Too few of these offerings are heard in live recital, apart from the two sets of Canzonets Haydn wrote during his visits to England in the early 1790s.
Catherine will present a sparkling programme of canzonets, cantatas and songs by Haydn and his English contemporaries, accompanied on forepiano by David McGuinness.
As well as adopting an Italian name, he too visited Italy, and composed Italian canzonets.(54) In addition, the Private Musick incorporated and was influenced by a number of French musicians, most notably Etienne (Stephen) Nau and Nicholas Picart.(55) Charles himself appears to have taken an interest in the music of the group: there are records in the royal accounts of payments being made for manuscripts compiled 'by his [Ma.sup.ts] speciall Comand'.(56) Under Lanier, the company of singer-lutenists expanded, and, significantly, came to include the Lawes brothers and Wilson.
His best works, however, are his graceful, musical canzonets. These are lighthearted compositions, apparently influenced by the 16th-century French Pleiade poets, in which he experiments with the introduction of 4-, 5-, 6-, 8-, and 9-syllable lines (rather than the 11- and 7-syllable lines of previous practice) and with varieties of syllabic stress.
Among his writings are Observations on the Principles and Methods of Infant Instruction (1830); Tablets (1868), a miscellany in prose and verse; Concord Days (1872), a memoir based on his journals; Table Talk (1877); New Connecticut (1881), about his youth; Sonnets and Canzonets (1882), a memorial to his wife; and Ralph Waldo Emerson (1882).
Thomas Morley (1557 or 1558-1602) is probably best known today as the writer of the Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke, first printed in London by Peter Short in 1597, reissued in 1608 and 1771, and republished in modern times in the 1966 edition by Alec Harman; as the composer of canzonets and light madrigals; or as publisher in 1601 of the anthology The Triumphes [sic] of Oriana, which modern research tells us may, or may not, have been intended as a tribute to Queen Elizabeth I.
Three Canzonets, from Canzonette a tre voci (1584) for SSA unaccompanied.
Some Haydn English Canzonets were delightfully done: "She never told her love" was touching and compassionate; Sailor's Song drew a pert, neatly turned accompaniment from sister Jennifer.